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03: Herausforderung Disruptive Innovation: Strategien für eine erfolgreiche Bewältigung

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Hauptschule
Breakout / Working Group
in englischer Sprache

Steigender Wettbewerbsdruck durch Globalisierung und disruptive Technologien machen Innovation einmal mehr zum ökonomischen Überlebensprinzip. Unternehmen müssen sich ständig neu erfinden und forcieren daher dynamische und unternehmensübergreifende Innovationsprozesse. Welche Strategien, Methoden und Prozesse braucht es, um Unternehmen erfolgreich an neue Bedingungen anzupassen und ein nachhaltiges Wachstum zu ermöglichen? Welche Best Practices gibt es? Welche Rolle kommt dem Top-Management in der Führung vom disruptiven Wandel zu? Können gewonnene Erkenntnisse für Unternehmen verallgemeinert werden?

Vortragende

Member of the Provincial Government of Upper Austria for Education, Science and Research, Women and Youth, Linz Introduction
Deputy Governor, State of Upper Austria, Linz Introduction
Chairman of the Supervisory Board, Fronius International GmbH, Vienna Abstract
Disruptive innovations need visions!
A flight to the moon with Klaus Fronius describes our vision process.
The vision development and verbalization, global reflection to the mankind, customer and market focus and finally the derived solutions and products are the essential steps.

"24 hours of sun" is the Fronius vision of how energy will be supplied in the coming decades. Solar energy, wind energy and water power are the key aspects to meeting future energy needs. The challenge facing renewable energies is to provide power exactly when it is needed, regardless of the time of day or year, and thus ensure an optimum supply framework. On the one hand, power consumption is matched to generation and vice versa (e.g. using energy management and load management systems), while on the other, excess power is stored and later retrieved from the storage facilities if generation is insufficient to meet demand.

Within this vision the Fronius Energy Cell plays an important part, which is paving the way for a transition from a centralized to a decentralized supply of energy. This means increasing the private consumption of energy generated from photovoltaic sources and to a large extent achieving energy autonomy. Intelligent energy management and a smart combination of storage systems, batteries for short-term storage and hydrogen for long-term storage, make's this possible.

The Fronius Energy Cell has a decentralized approach at a family home level, to produce energy there where it's needed. The big inherent advantage is that the waste heat of the system can be used in the family home for heating and hot water, hence increases significant the overall efficiency. In central power plants in general the heat can't be used on site and additional long-distance heat pipelines are expensive and hence often not implemented.
Since the storage is local also a power grid expansion can be avoided. Such central concepts are in discussion for Europe. These concepts are controversial, because you need new strength power lines through Europe, which need land and big investments. In this case you don't use the big opportunity of the renewable energies, produce energy locally where it's needed.
Head, Technical Project XL1, Volkswagen AG, Wolfsburg Abstract
"It is a demonstration of boundaries successfully pushed and expanded, and you can't unlearn this kind of progress". It is with this reasoning that TopGear awarded the Volkswagen XL1 the Title "Innovation of the Year". But how exactly did the XL1 become the first Super Efficient Vehicle in automotive history?

The 1-litre-car has been famous since Prof. Dr. Piëch, then Volkswagen Group chairman of the board, shared his vision with the world and drove the first one-liter-car from Wolfsburg to Hamburg in 2002. Since then, the vehicle concept evolved and passed from a one-off to a real-ity. 250 XL1 will be built, of which the first car was delivered to a customer in May 2014.

To reach the ambitious efficiency targets, Volkswagen planned the XL1 based on two princi-ples. On the one hand an impressive reduction of resistances and drag was required, while and on the other hand powertrain efficiency was crucial. Only the combination of these two re-quirements in a way never done before was able to set the record-breaking efficiency found in the XL1.

In developing the XL1, Volkswagen had to break the weight spiral. Total weight of the XL1 amounts to 795kg, so the engineers of Volkswagen were able to shed off about 500 kgs com-pared to a normal midsized car. Amazing materials as CFK and intelligent engineering solu-tions were the keys to achieve this milestone.

Additionally, a clear priority to aerodynamics engineering starting from the basic vehicle shape and finally leading to the inclusion of many aerodynamic details allow the car to reduce the frontal surface and drag to unrivalled values. A great example of the successful combination of aerodynamics and technology is the e-mirror which provides the driver with an extended view without blind spot.

Finally the XL1 provides a pioneering powertrain solution. Volkswagen Group's first plug-in hybrid-powertrain combines a 2-cylinder 35 kW TDI engine with a 20 kW e-machine, which allows the use of many different modes, including 50 kms of pure electrical driving. Still it combines best of both worlds, as the 10 liter fuel tank will allow for another 450 km of reach.

The Volkswagen XL1.
The first Super Efficient Vehicle.
President, Gi & Pa AG, Nuremberg Abstract
Innovation is an ongoing process and is mainly technically driven; it is not always disruptive and but is necessary if evolution, growth and wellbeing are to be achieved.
In the same way that it may become disruptive it also creates new opportunities.
The new opportunities do not necessarily balance or compensate for what has been destroyed in social terms, and as a result social polarization may occur.
Innovation may become disruptive for those who are not able to participate or play a full part! Main reasons are besides others quite often a lack of vison of the management or even the image and structure of the company or products themselves. Financial restrictions may become crucial within the time being. Change management or joint ventures may be discussed as opportunities.
Chief Scientist, aKAP Innovation, LLC; Chairperson, IT10 - Digital Photography, Society for Imaging Sciences and Technology; Former Chief Scientist, Digital Camera Division, Eastman Kodak; Rochester Abstract
Disruptive Innovation is driven by new inventions. These inventions are made by inventors, not by corporations, universities, or other employers. Most inventors are highly motivated to bring their ideas to life, in new products or services. But this often fails, unless their employer not only shares their vision, but also has the needed technical, marketing, manufacturing, and financial resources. Is it possible to develop a more efficient structure, where talented inventors are part of a larger ecosystem that both shares their vision and has the resources needed to bring their ideas to life?
Writer; Director, Deloitte Services LP, Ontario Abstract
It is increasingly accepted that innovation need not be a random event and can instead be a deliberate act. Yet there is no meaningful definition of "innovation". This is a critical failing, because we cannot manage successfully what we cannot define precisely. Using the foundational principles of micro-economic theory, Dr. Michael Raynor provides a sound and practical way of thinking about innovation as "breaking constraints": going beyond the limits of the currently possible.

Not all innovation is created equal, however. Disruptive innovation can be shown to be systematically more successful when entering new markets. Drawing on ground-breaking experimental research, Raynor will show how to think about disruption in ways that allow you to harness its predictive power in order to shape your innovations in ways that increase their probability of survival.

Finally, for all our advances, we cannot banish uncertainty from our efforts to innovate disruptively. Drawing on advances in real option theory and organizational design, Raynor will show how companies can cope with and, at the limit, exploit the unpredictability of the future to gain a competitive advantage over their rivals.

In this powerful synthesis of over a decade of research, Raynor will weave together much of what he has learned about innovation, disruption and strategic flexibility into an "eternal golden braid" of actionable insights.
Teamleader, Sales Development Solar Energy, Fronius International GmbH, Wels Abstract
Disruptive innovations need visions!
A flight to the moon with Klaus Fronius describes our vision process.
The vision development and verbalization, global reflection to the mankind, customer and market focus and finally the derived solutions and products are the essential steps.

"24 hours of sun" is the Fronius vision of how energy will be supplied in the coming decades. Solar energy, wind energy and water power are the key aspects to meeting future energy needs. The challenge facing renewable energies is to provide power exactly when it is needed, regardless of the time of day or year, and thus ensure an optimum supply framework. On the one hand, power consumption is matched to generation and vice versa (e.g. using energy management and load management systems), while on the other, excess power is stored and later retrieved from the storage facilities if generation is insufficient to meet demand.

Within this vision the Fronius Energy Cell plays an important part, which is paving the way for a transition from a centralized to a decentralized supply of energy. This means increasing the private consumption of energy generated from photovoltaic sources and to a large extent achieving energy autonomy. Intelligent energy management and a smart combination of storage systems, batteries for short-term storage and hydrogen for long-term storage, make's this possible.

The Fronius Energy Cell has a decentralized approach at a family home level, to produce energy there where it's needed. The big inherent advantage is that the waste heat of the system can be used in the family home for heating and hot water, hence increases significant the overall efficiency. In central power plants in general the heat can't be used on site and additional long-distance heat pipelines are expensive and hence often not implemented.
Since the storage is local also a power grid expansion can be avoided. Such central concepts are in discussion for Europe. These concepts are controversial, because you need new strength power lines through Europe, which need land and big investments. In this case you don't use the big opportunity of the renewable energies, produce energy locally where it's needed.
Associate Professor, Management and Organization Department, Carroll School of Management, Boston College, Chestnut Hill Abstract
When adapting to radical, disruptive technological change, managers often focus their efforts on developing new technical capabilities and adapting strategies and business models to accommodate the new context. While these activities are valuable, I propose that a more fundamental type of reflection is appropriate. Technological change can sometimes challenge the core of how an organization views itself, calling into question organizational identity. To respond effectively, managers need to rethink deeply held assumptions and beliefs about the answer to "Who are we?" Failure to do so can have fatal consequences.
For instance, despite developing leading-edge digital imaging technologies early on, Polaroid was unable to move beyond its identity as an Instant Photography firm, which constrained the organization's ability to effectively commercialize digital imaging technologies. In contrast, Fujifilm had a more flexible, robust identity that evolved to accommodate digital technology. President and CEO of Fujifilm Holdings, Shigetaka Komori explained in an interview, "We thought of ourselves as an imaging company, whether film or digital," (Tripsas, 2009). As Fujifilm has continued to explore other opportunities, the organization has diversified into a number of new markets, such as flat-panel display materials, that build upon its specialty chemicals expertise and extend its scope well beyond imaging. Recognizing the importance of articulating a new organizational identity, Komori commented "We are no longer just an 'information and imaging' company, but it is difficult to communicate exactly what we are, and this creates challenges for the organization," (Tripsas, 2009).

Tripsas, M. "When Names Change to Protect the Future," New York Times Nov. 28, 2009
Professor, Head DOM Research Lab, University of Arts and Design Linz Chair
Manager, Investor Relations and Location Management, Business Upper Austria - OÖ Wirtschaftsagentur GmbH, Linz Coordination

Mag.a Doris HUMMER

Member of the Provincial Government of Upper Austria for Education, Science and Research, Women and Youth, Linz

1992-1997 Studium der Volkswirtschaft an der Johannes Kepler Universität Linz
1995-1996 Auslandsstudium in Wolverhampton, Großbritannien, Schwerpunkt: Marketing
1998 Personal- und Marketingleitung Domico Dach-, Wand- und Fassadensysteme GesmbH & Co. KG, Vöcklamarkt
2002 Unternehmensgründung Whitebox Marktforschung | Mystery-Shopping, Hummer und Koch OG, Linz
seit 2009 Mitglied der Oberösterreichischen Landesregierung für die Referate Bildung, Wissenschaft und Forschung, Frauen und Jugend

Mag. Dr. MBA Michael STRUGL

Deputy Governor, State of Upper Austria, Linz

1982-1991 Diplomstudium der Rechtswissenschaften, Johannes Kepler Universität Linz
1998-1999 LIMAK General Management Program, Linz, Emory University/Atlanta
2000-2001 Studium "International Finance", Graduierung zum MBA, University of Toronto
  während des Studiums: IMAS-Meinungsforschungsinstitut Linz
2005-2013 Doktoratsstudium der Sozial- und Wirtschaftswissenschaften, Johannes Kepler Universität Linz
1987-1995 ÖVP Pressereferent Landesparteileitung Oberösterreich
1997 ÖVP Wahlkampfleiter OÖ Landtagswahl, Landesparteileitung Oberösterreich
1998 Creativ-Direktor, Werbeagentur Zoffel-Hoff & Partner, Wiesbaden
1999 Wahlkampfleiter Nationalratswahl, Österreichische Volkspartei
1995-2001 Stv. Landesgeschäftsführer, ÖVP Landesparteileitung Oberösterreich,
1997-2001 Mitglied des Bundesrates
  Wirtschaftskammerwahl Österreich/Oberösterreich
2000 Entwicklung und Betreuung der Wahlkampagnen für Dr. Christoph Leitl und KommR Viktor Sigl,
2001-2013 Abgeordneter zum OÖ. Landtag
2001-2013 Landesgeschäftsführer, ÖVP Landesparteileitung Oberösterreich
2003 Wahlkampfleiter OÖ Landtagswahl, ÖVP Landesparteileitung Oberösterreich
2003-2009 Klubobmann, ÖVP Landtagsklub
2009 Wahlkampfleiter OÖ Landtagswahl, ÖVP Landesparteileitung Oberösterreich
seit 2013 Landesrat für Wirtschaft, Arbeit, Tourismus, Raumordnung Regionalentwicklung, Europa und Sport, Land OÖ
seit 2015 Landesrat für Wirtschaft, Arbeit, Energie, Tourismus, Sport, Raumordnung, Regionalentwicklung und Europa
seit 2017 Landeshauptmann-Stellvertreter Land OÖ und in der OÖ Landesregierung zuständige Regierungsmitglied für Wirtschaft, Arbeit, Forschung, Wissenschaft, Energie, Tourismus, Raumordnung, Landesholding, Europa und Sport

Ing. Klaus FRONIUS

Chairman of the Supervisory Board, Fronius International GmbH, Vienna

1965-1970 Technologisches Gewerbemuseum, Wien
1973 Start bei Fronius International GmbH, Pettenbach
seit 1975 Geschäftsführer und Eigentümer, Fronius International GmbH
1994 Mitinitiator zur Gründung der Fachhochschule Wels

Michael E. RAYNOR

Writer; Director, Deloitte Services LP, Ontario

 Undergraduate degree in philosophy, Harvard University
 Master's degree in business administration, Ivey School of Business, University of Western Ontario
 Doctorat, Harvard Business School
 Taught in the MBA and Executive Education programs at the Richard Ivey School of Business, University of Western Ontario, and at the IMD Business School, Lausanne
 Director at Deloitte Services LP and Innovation Theme Leader in the firm s Eminence function
 Advisor to senior executives in the world's leading corporations across a wide range of industries

Dipl.-Ing. Michael SCHUBERT

Teamleader, Sales Development Solar Energy, Fronius International GmbH, Wels

 Diplomstudium in Elektrotechnik/Nachrichtentechnik an der TU Wien
1994-2007 Siemens AG Österreich, zuerst in der Entwicklung im Telekommunikationsbereich dann im Vertriebsbereich
2001-2004 Leiter der Consultingabteilung des Enterprise Kommunikationsbereiches
bis 2007 für die Einführung neuer Technologien sowohl in der Akquisition als auch in der Realisierung zuständig
seit 2006 Zertifizierter Senior Projektmanager nach IPMA
seit 2007 Fronius International GmbH, in der Sparte Solar Energy für das Sales Development neuer Technologien und Märkte verantwortlich. Hierzu zählen vor allem die Themen Speicherlösungen (Wasserstoff, Batterietechnologie) und Projekt Märkte.

Michael SHAMIYEH

Professor, Head DOM Research Lab, University of Arts and Design Linz

 Michael Shamiyeh helps organizations to define the framework for compelling innovation strategies, to sense, create, and implement desired futures, and to build their own capabilities, systems, and structures that are right for change. His customers include leading international enterprises from the fields of engineering & assembly, global energy & materials, as well as consumer & leisure.
 He is founder and head professor of the Design Organization Media (DOM) Research Lab at the University of Arts and Design Linz, which is an internationally recognized academic research and consultancy center for innovation and change, based at the University of Arts and Design in Linz, Austria, and CEO of Shamiyeh Associates Limited, a firm that works to create desired futures.
 Michael studied management at the University of St. Gallen (PhD) and architecture at Harvard University (MArch-postprofessional), the Architectural Association in London (MA), and the Technical University of Vienna (Dipl-Ing/MA). He has published in many international journals, books, and popular media. His most recent publications include "Driving Desired Futures: Turning Design Thinking into Real Innovation" (2014) and "Porsche Prinzip Innovation" (2013).
 The work of Michael and his team has won many awards, including two Gold Medals for "Best Invention" given by KIWIE, Korea (2010), and by the World Intellectual Property Organization (2010), and the Innovation Prize (2009), awarded by the Austrian Ministry of Science.

Mag. MBA Anke MERKL-RACHBAUER

Manager, Investor Relations and Location Management, Business Upper Austria - OÖ Wirtschaftsagentur GmbH, Linz

 Since 1996, Mrs. Anke Merkl-Rachbauer has been working as for the Upper Austrian Business Development Agency and is head of the department location development.marketing.communication . This she has almost 20 years of experience in the fields of regional economic and innovation development and cluster-policy.
 
 Anke is responsible for location development and branding of the region of Upper Austria. Prior she was responsible for the coordination of the strategic economic and research programme for Upper Austria, named "Innovative Upper Austria 2010plus". Between 2005 and 2011 she headed the project "Plastics Location Upper Austria", building up strategically the educational & research infrastructure in Upper Austria, accompanied by place branding measures for the plastics location Upper Austria. Placed Branding being defined as an uttermost important topic to attract talented people into the region, she is currently working on a strategy for Upper Austria.

Technologiegespräche

Timetable einblenden

21.08.2014

10:00 - 12:30TechnologiebrunchSocial
13:00 - 13:10Eröffnung der Alpbacher Technologiegespräche 2014Plenary
13:10 - 14:00FTI-Politik at the CrossroadsPlenary
14:00 - 15:45Industrie 4.0 - Die nächste industrielle Revolution?Plenary
16:15 - 17:45Stanford zu Gast bei den Technologiegesprächen: Innovation und die Kultur des ScheiternsPlenary
20:00 - 21:30Wir und unser Gehirn - Neurologische Forschung at the CrossroadsPlenary
21:45 - 23:00AbendempfangSocial
21:45 - 23:00KarriereloungeSocial

22.08.2014

09:00 - 15:00Breakout Session 01: Technology - Global Market: Österreichische Technologien für den globalen MarktBreakout
09:00 - 15:00Breakout Session 02: Technologie-Hotspots der Zukunft - Hat Europa eine Chance?Breakout
09:00 - 15:00Breakout Session 03: Herausforderung Disruptive Innovation: Strategien für eine erfolgreiche BewältigungBreakout
09:00 - 15:00Breakout Session 04: Agile und robuste Supply Chain - Volatilität im Wirtschaftsleben erfolgreich managenBreakout
09:00 - 15:00Breakout Session 05: Bioenergie - Ausweg oder Irrtum?Breakout
09:00 - 15:00Breakout Session 06: Was kostet die Zukunft der Stadt? Sozioökonomische Aspekte der Smart CityBreakout
09:00 - 15:00Breakout Session 07: Smart Energy: Herausforderungen an eine interdisziplinäre EnergiewendeBreakout
09:00 - 15:00Breakout Session 08: Wissenschaft in der Gesellschaft - Wie man Barrieren überwinden kannBreakout
09:00 - 15:00Breakout Session 09: IP-Strategien in Unternehmen: Herausforderungen für das IP-Management und die InnovationspolitikBreakout
09:00 - 15:00Breakout Session 10: Forschungsfinanzierung - Öffentlich oder privat? Neue Modelle in einer globalisierten WeltBreakout
09:00 - 15:00Breakout Session 11: Akustik-Innovationen: Trends in Industrie und AlltagBreakout
09:00 - 18:00Junior Alpbach - Wissenschaft und Technologie für junge MenschenBreakout
09:00 - 15:00Ö1 Kinderuni Alpbach - Wissenschaft und Technologie für KinderBreakout
16:00 - 16:45Digital UniversityPlenary
16:45 - 18:15Open Science - Wissen von und für Menschen in der GesellschaftPlenary
18:30 - 20:00Städte at the CrossroadsPlenary
20:00 - 22:00Urban Innovators Challenge - Stadt und ZukunftPartner

23.08.2014

09:00 - 10:30Complexity Science - IPlenary
10:30 - 11:15Complexity Science - IIPlenary
11:45 - 13:15Innovation an der Schnittstelle von Kunst und WissenschaftPlenary
13:15 - 13:30Abschluss-Statement der Alpbacher TechnologiegesprächePlenary
13:30 - 14:00Imbiss zum Abschluss der VeranstaltungSocial