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10: Smart Governance for smart Specialisation

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Hauptschule
Breakout / Working Group
in englischer Sprache

‚Smart Specialisation‘ heißt der neue europäische Zugang zum nachhaltigen Wachstum seiner Regionen. Doch ‚Smart Specialisation‘ braucht auch ‚Smart Governance‘. Was müssen also Regionen in Zukunft tun, um die zunehmende Komplexität regionaler Innovationspolitik erfolgreich zu meistern? Wie können junge Menschen als Stakeholder gewonnen und eingebunden werden? Welche Rolle spielen dabei neue Technologien wie soziale Medien aber auch bestehende Methoden partizipativer Steuerung? Diskutieren Sie mit österreichischen und europäischen ExpertInnen und VertreterInnen von smarten Regionen zum Thema.

Vortragende

Member of the Provincial Government of Upper Austria for Education, Science and Research, Women and Youth, Linz Introduction
Upper Austrian State Minister for Economic Affairs and Labour, Linz Introduction
Head, Innovation Bureau, Innovation Alliance of Karlsruhe Technology Region, Karlsruhe Chamber of Industry and Commerce, Karlsruhe Abstract
"Smart Specialization is about generating unique assets and capabilities based on the region's distinctive industry structures and knowledge bases" (Guide to RIS3 2012). One example to promote this target in the technology region Karlsruhe is the Innovation Alliance.

The Innovation Alliance helps small and medium enterprises (SMEs) to find the right partner in regional research institutions. Launched in November 2011, the project is an offer for enterprises sui generis. It builds on a promising strategy for technology transfer: personal care and free mediation of scientific contacts. This is achieved through cooperation of six regional research facilities and the establishment of one principal point of contact in the Chamber of Industry and Commerce, and therefore in immediate proximity to the economy.

The first step for interested SMEs is a personal and technology open initial consultation in the Innovation Office, located in the Chamber of Industry and Commerce, Karlsruhe. The Innovation Alliance coordinator assesses the SME requests, elucidates the relevant technological and scientific fields and identifies the potential for project collaborations.
This information is used in the second step to identify appropriate partners from science in the different research institutions of Karlsruhe. Contact persons in the involved research organizations ensure that all research fields and potentially relevant scientists are considered.
Third, SMEs and the identified scientists are invited to meet directly in order to develop business relationships and decide upon collaboration.
Potential forms of cooperation are:
- Exchange of expert knowledge/state-of-the-art information
- Shared bachelor or master theses
- Research commissioned by the SMEs
- Joint research projects
- Full-scale research collaborations

The whole process is accompanied by the Innovation Office and free of costs for the SMEs. Confidentiality of the request is always ensured. The Innovations Alliance Karlsruhe consists of the Chamber of Industry and Commerce and six regional research institutions:
- Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT);
- Karlsruhe University of Applied Sciences;
- FZI Forschungszentrum Informatik;
- Fraunhofer Institute for Chemical Technology;
- Fraunhofer Institute of Optronics, System Technologies and Image Exploitation;
- Fraunhofer Institute for Systems and Innovation Research ISI
Director, Regional Strategies and Innovation, Steinbeis-Europa-Zentrum, Stuttgart Abstract
Rather recently, the Smart Specialisation concept has moved from the academic world to the high-level policy scene:
- In 2011, the OECD established a project to reflect on the role of STI specialization in shaping the comparative advantage of countries and regions.
- In the same year, the European Commission (EC) supported by a Smart Specialisation Platform, started to ask policy makers and stakeholders of the Member States to develop Regional Innovation Strategies for Smart Specialisation (RIS3).
Similar in their first phase, both aim at identifying characteristics and assets of territories, which distinguish them from others, and enable them to exploit context-based competitive advantages in global value chains. According to the different mandates, the expected results of the OECD project are general implications for STI policies, while the EC requests RIS3 as 'ex-ante conditionalities' for future Structural Fund support from 2014 to 2020. This evidently means that in the latter case analysis and knowledge sharing is not enough, but that it is necessary to move further, to best select the economic sectors, technology fields etc to be suggested for Structural Funds support, to set priorities (and with this to decide against other possible fields to be supported), and to firmly commit regional stakeholders and resources around these priorities. At the heart of Smart Specialisation is, from the regional perspective, the notion of policy learning to develop 'smart governance', and from the EC perspective, a mechanism for harnessing the benefits of regional diversity, for stimulating cooperation across borders, and for creating new opportunities.
This brings Regional Foresight (RF) into play with its key objectives to provide strategic knowledge, to make it available ('translate') to and ensure the long-term commitment of all relevant stakeholders and innovation partners.
Against this backdrop, the role of RF for better regional STI investment strategies will be outlined, as well as its relationship with other policy support tools such as technology assessment, S&T roadmapping, monitoring and evaluation. Key features are discussed:
- why and how 'better' decisions can be arrived at;
- how key challenges of the different regional decision makers are addressed;
- how commitment from the diversity of actors can be achieved;
- and how, through integrated approaches, Regional Innovation Ecosystems as a whole can be upgraded and their competitiveness increased.
By means of concrete regional and multiregional case studies, overviews are given on methodologies and techniques, and exemplary results presented. Finally, bridging elements to the other presentations are highlighted, and the RF presentation linked back to the overall theme of the workshop.
Adviser, Department Youth Policy, Federal Ministry of Economy, Family and Youth, Vienna Abstract
The interactive web offers new ways to involve people in participatory processes, not necessarily in politicial participation. Just because people like to collect links together, publish photos or videos or parctipate in a creative process for ie. a new motorcar they are not necessarily interested to shape policy through these means. How to transform the sharing of thoughts to the cooperative development of concrete ideas?
10 Rules in 20 minutes should give you a glimpse on how participation can be encouraged in the era of web 2.0 (social media).

• Rule 1: Don't act! Listen!
• Rule 2: Participation has always been 2.0
• Rule 3: Web 2.0 reinforces the active ones
• Rule 4: You need translators
• Rule 5: No information = No participation
• Rule 6: There is no "out of the box"
• Rule 7: Make it accessible
• Rule 8: Democracy is not like "muesli"
• Rule 9: Participation 2.0 is a mashup
• Rule 10: Rules are to be broken
Managing Director, Oberösterreichische Technologie- und Marketinggesellschaft m.b.H., Linz
Staff Member, Innovation Alliance of Karlsruhe TechnologyRegion, Karlsruhe Chamber of Industry and Commerce, Karlsruhe Abstract
"Smart Specialization is about generating unique assets and capabilities based on the region's distinctive industry structures and knowledge bases" (Guide to RIS3 2012). One example to promote this target in the technology region Karlsruhe is the Innovation Alliance.

The Innovation Alliance helps small and medium enterprises (SMEs) to find the right partner in regional research institutions. Launched in November 2011, the project is an offer for enterprises sui generis. It builds on a promising strategy for technology transfer: personal care and free mediation of scientific contacts. This is achieved through cooperation of six regional research facilities and the establishment of one principal point of contact in the Chamber of Industry and Commerce, and therefore in immediate proximity to the economy.

The first step for interested SMEs is a personal and technology open initial consultation in the Innovation Office, located in the Chamber of Industry and Commerce, Karlsruhe. The Innovation Alliance coordinator assesses the SME requests, elucidates the relevant technological and scientific fields and identifies the potential for project collaborations.
This information is used in the second step to identify appropriate partners from science in the different research institutions of Karlsruhe. Contact persons in the involved research organizations ensure that all research fields and potentially relevant scientists are considered.
Third, SMEs and the identified scientists are invited to meet directly in order to develop business relationships and decide upon collaboration.
Potential forms of cooperation are:
- Exchange of expert knowledge/state-of-the-art information
- Shared bachelor or master theses
- Research commissioned by the SMEs
- Joint research projects
- Full-scale research collaborations

The whole process is accompanied by the Innovation Office and free of costs for the SMEs. Confidentiality of the request is always ensured. The Innovations Alliance Karlsruhe consists of the Chamber of Industry and Commerce and six regional research institutions:
- Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT);
- Karlsruhe University of Applied Sciences;
- FZI Forschungszentrum Informatik;
- Fraunhofer Institute for Chemical Technology;
- Fraunhofer Institute of Optronics, System Technologies and Image Exploitation;
- Fraunhofer Institute for Systems and Innovation Research ISI
International Expert on Science, Technology and Innovation Policy, Brussels Abstract
Designing a regional innovation strategy for smart specialization - a RIS3 - starts with the adoption of a shared vision for the transformation of the regional economy towards a more competitive and more sustainable one, in a long term perspective. The core of this design process lies in the definition of priorities for knowledge-based economic development, identified on the basis of the region's unique strengths and potential. This strategic choice should form the baseline for a concentration of public resources and actions into these prioritized areas, turning the vision into policy action. A RIS3 Action plan is the necessary complement of the strategy: it is a goal-oriented plan that presents a coherent mix of measures and actions, along with quantified targets and budgets, and embodies evaluation mechanisms in order to feed the RIS3 evolution.
The methods to use and practical steps to take for designing a RIS3 can take inspiration from two decades of efforts by regions in the EU to develop regional innovation policies. A lot of experimentation exists, many good practices have developed over time, mistakes provide valuable lessons too and the corpus of policy knowledge (both codified and tacit) is expanding quickly. RIS3 is a policy innovation aiming to address some bottlenecks or shortcomings from the past. The key innovation of RIS3 lies in its open vision: rather than aiming at developing innovation strongholds in the narrow perspective of a region's boundaries, it is based on the identification of a region's smart specialization potential within an international context. The regional competitive advantage, based on the exploitation of local assets, should be relevant on the global scene. The RIS3 concept provides also a momentum to address several other bottlenecks found in the practice of regional innovation policy, notably the need to create a robust evidence base to support policy choices and the necessity to adopt integrated policy frameworks fostering synergies between different policy domains and levels.
This presentation will develop these ideas, building on a critical analysis of regional innovation strategies in Europe in the last two decades. It will offer ten key principles and ten key steps to follow, as guidelines for the development of such strategies.
Strategy Advisor on Regional Innovation and Economic Development, Brainport Development, Eindhoven Abstract
In 2011, Brainport Eindhoven Region was awarded as ‘Intelligent Community’ by the Intelligent Community Forum. Smart governance and open innovation were the main reasons why the region was awarded – out of 400 regions.
This award was a result of a 20 year process in which the regional ecosystem evolved from closed to open innovation and from a region dominated by some large companies towards a region with a vibrant mix of large, medium sized and small companies interacting with each other and with the public knowledge institutes.

A smart governance model was a key factor in this transformation process. The triple helix cooperation between enterprises, education- and knowledge institutes and regional government has evolved to a high level strategic partnership: the Brainport Foundation. This foundation is powerful because of the members, but also because of a powerful regional development agency that is responsible for the rollout of the strategy, defined by the Brainport Foundation. This development agency, Brainport Development, uses an unique approach to start and develop projects that strengthen the regional innovation ecosystem. Important elements are:
- Project ideas have no natural ‘owner’
- Projects focus on strengthening the regional structure in stead of solving an individual problem
- Projects are lead by the problem owners; Brainport Development only facilitates
- After business plan development and start of rollout, the project is outsourced
This will be illustrated with some concrete examples of smart specialisation at the intersection of different sectors and in the field of attracting talent.
Managing Director, ILD Temper-Samhaber, St. Martin Abstract
Questions. What must regions do in future in order to successfully master the growing complexity of regional innovation policies? How can young people be won over as stakeholders and included in this process? What role will both new technologies such as social media and existing methods of participative control play in this regard?

12 tips as to how one can lose the young and permanently weaken regional innovative capacity.

If one intends to limit a region decisively with regard to its development capacity, innovative potential and social functions, there is hardly a more suitable means than excluding its young people from the greatest possible number of areas.

In some regions this has been practiced successfully for decades, generally in an unconscious manner, but frequently with a systematic approach. In my presentation, which should serve as a stimulus for discussion and makes no claims to completeness, I shall present twelve methods by which the non-participation of young people can be successfully achieved.

These relate to the actions of decision-makers regarding young people within their regions in relation to the following topics:

Space
Young people within the region should be allocated a minimum possible amount of space
(virtual, medial, geographic) and when they are allocated a degree of elbow room, this should only consist of areas strictly controlled by adults. In principle, three spatial zones are on offer to the young, consisting of school, the family and defined, consumer-oriented leisure facilities. Apart from these, young people should remain inconspicuous in the public area.

Perception
In principle, the rule applies that young people should be imperceptible! If a region does not concern itself systematically with the activities, perspectives and environments of its young people, it is easier to make decisions of current relevance that conform with the expectations of adults.

Information
Ideally, regional policy activities should be presented in a form that is the least attractive possible for young people. This prevents the impression that regional policy has anything to do with youth.

Codetermination
In order to be able to exclude the young from decision-making procedures, it is generally sufficient to quite simply not explicitly invite them to participate. Decision-making processes should be so organized as to be opaque, complicated and boring, and occur at places and times that are difficult for young people to reach or attend. When persons with a political mandate are the only ones to take a decision, the chances are extremely slim that young people will be among them.
Head of Research Group, Technology, Foresight and Planning, Centre for Economic and Innovation Research, JOANNEUM RESEARCH Forschungsgesellschaft mbH, Graz Chair
Manager, Investor Relations and Location Management, Business Upper Austria - OÖ Wirtschaftsagentur GmbH, Linz Coordination

Mag.a Doris HUMMER

Member of the Provincial Government of Upper Austria for Education, Science and Research, Women and Youth, Linz

1992-1997 Studium der Volkswirtschaft an der Johannes Kepler Universität Linz
1995-1996 Auslandsstudium in Wolverhampton, Großbritannien, Schwerpunkt: Marketing
1998 Personal- und Marketingleitung Domico Dach-, Wand- und Fassadensysteme GesmbH & Co. KG, Vöcklamarkt
2002 Unternehmensgründung Whitebox Marktforschung | Mystery-Shopping, Hummer und Koch OG, Linz
seit 2009 Mitglied der Oberösterreichischen Landesregierung für die Referate Bildung, Wissenschaft und Forschung, Frauen und Jugend

Viktor SIGL

Upper Austrian State Minister for Economic Affairs and Labour, Linz

 Einzelkaufmannslehre und Ablegung der Konzessionsprüfung für das Reisebürogewerbe
seit 1977 Reisebüro- und Taxiunternehmer in Bad Kreuzen
seit 1979 Gemeinderat in Bad Kreuzen
1985-2006 Bürgermeister von Bad Kreuzen
1990-2000 Oberösterreichischer Landtagsabgeordneter
2000-2003 Präsident der Wirtschaftskammer Oberösterreich
seit 2001 Aufsichtsrat der OÖ. Technologie- und Marketinggesellschaft / aktuell Aufsichtsratsvorsitzender
seit 2003 Landesrat, aktuell zuständig für Wirtschaft, Tourismus, Arbeit, Europa, Sport, Raumordnung, Staatsbürgerschaft und Wahlen

Dr. Markus BAUER

Head, Innovation Bureau, Innovation Alliance of Karlsruhe Technology Region, Karlsruhe Chamber of Industry and Commerce, Karlsruhe

1998-2003 Studium Geoökologie, Universität Bayreuth
2004-2008 Forschung, Promotion (Mobilität von Arsen in Natursystemen)
2008-2011 Forschung, Projektkoordination ALCATRAP (Chem. Verfahrenstechnik, CO2-Abtrennung aus Rauchgasen)
seit 2012 Scientific Relations Manager, Abteilung Innovationsmanagement am Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT), Koordinator der Innovationsallianz für die Technologieregion Karlsruhe

Dr. rer. nat. Guenter CLAR

Director, Regional Strategies and Innovation, Steinbeis-Europa-Zentrum, Stuttgart

1974-1981 University of Stuttgart, Ministry of Education
1981-1982 Visiting Professor Tong Ji University, Shanghai
1983-1985 Visiting Professor University S. Maria
1986 Advisor, Steinbeis-Foundation for Economic Development
1987-1989 Senior Planning Officer, GTZ, Eschborn
1989-1993 Team leader Environment Mgt Centre, Brazil
1993-1998 Vice-Director Center of Technology Assessment
1999-2003 Senior Advisor, European Commission, DG Research
since 2004 Director Regional Strategies & Innovation, SEZ

Robert LENDER

Adviser, Department Youth Policy, Federal Ministry of Economy, Family and Youth, Vienna

seit 1987 im Bundesdienst
1989-1990 Ministerbüro, Bundesministerium für Umwelt, Jugend und Familie
seit 1990 Abteilung Jugendpolitik im jeweiligen "Jugendressort"
1991-1993 Mobile Jugendinformation
1994-1997 Leiter des Referats für präventive Jugendarbeit
seit 1998 Referent für Gesundheitsförderung/Prävention, Partizipation und Informationsgesellschaft

DI Bruno LINDORFER

Managing Director, Oberösterreichische Technologie- und Marketinggesellschaft m.b.H., Linz

  ab 1985 Abteilungsleiter von GCT 5, Entwicklung technischer Systeme, Thermotechnik
1981-1987 Sachbearbeiter Abteilung FAT ,VOEST-ALPINE AG, Linz
 Seit 1990 VOEST-ALPINE Industrieanlagenbau GesmbH, Linz
  1990-1994 Auslandsaufenthalt in USA (Pittsburgh, Buffalo) im Rahmen einer großen F&E Kooperation der VAI
  bis 1996 Leiter TSC 6 Forschung und Entwicklung Stranggießtechnik
  seit 1996 Leiter TET, Technologieprogramme
  seit 1998 Globaler Bereichsleiter CI, Forschung und Entwicklung der VAI Gruppe, Prokura
1987-1990 Leiter CAE, Fa. ENGEL Maschinenbau GesmbH, Schwertberg / OÖ
seit 2006 Globaler Senior Vice President Research & Development, Siemens VAI Metals Technologies GmbH & Co, Linz
seit 2008 Geschäftsführer, O.Ö. Technologie- und Marketing Gesellschaft mbH, Linz
seit 2011 Zusätzlich (in Personalunion) Geschäftsführer der neu gegründeten OÖ Innovationsholding GmbH

Dipl.-Pol. Marc MÜHLECK

Staff Member, Innovation Alliance of Karlsruhe TechnologyRegion, Karlsruhe Chamber of Industry and Commerce, Karlsruhe

2003-2008 Studium der Politikwissenschaft, Universität Bamberg
2008-2011 Doktorand; Graduiertenkolleg "Märkte und Sozialräume in Europa", Universität Bamberg
 Seit 2011 Referent Technologie / IT, IHK Karlsruhe
2008-2011 Dozent; Lehrstuhl für Internationale Beziehungen, Universität Bamberg

Dr. Claire NAUWELAERS

International Expert on Science, Technology and Innovation Policy, Brussels

 Claire NAUWELAERS is an independent Policy Analyst and Governmental Adviser, specialised in research and innovation policy, working in an international environment. She has 30 years of experience in this field and a wide network of contacts with experts, academics and policy-makers. Until 2011 she was working on innovation as a policy analyst in the Regional Development Policy Division at OECD. Previously, she was Research Director at UNU-MERIT, the University of Maastricht and United Nations University, in charge of the research team:  Governance of Science, Technology and Innovation». She started her career as researcher within two academic teams (the Interdisciplinary Centre in Regional Development, and the Interdisciplinary Centre Law-Economics) at the University of Louvain in Belgium, where she was in charge of research projects dealing with economic development and innovation.
 Her main areas of research and expertise revolve around the analysis and policy advice about the functioning of research and innovation systems, notably at the regional level. She is working on policy development, analysis and evaluation in the areas of Research, Technological Development and Innovation in response to needs from the European Commission, national and regional authorities. She is member of Scientific Steering Committees of several Research Networks, part of policy review teams, and is regularly invited as expert in High-Level Expert groups for the European Commission or Member States. She has published numerous books and articles on policy aspects of research, technology and innovation.

Linco NIEUWENHUYZEN

Strategy Advisor on Regional Innovation and Economic Development, Brainport Development, Eindhoven

2001-2007 Technology Management at Eindhoven University of Technology
2007-2010 Monitoring Specialist, Brainport Operations BV
since 2010 Strategy Advisor, Brainport Development

Thomas SAMHABER

Managing Director, ILD Temper-Samhaber, St. Martin

 Studies of German Philology, History, IT technology, Vienna
 Studies and lectures regarding the opening of the borders
 Reginal Developer, Moderator and cultural Manager
1987 permanent residence in the Waldviertel
since 2002 Manager, Business Consulting Agency ILD
since 2008 NÖ Jugendkongress-Lower Austrian youth congress

Mag. Dr. Christian HARTMANN

Head of Research Group, Technology, Foresight and Planning, Centre for Economic and Innovation Research, JOANNEUM RESEARCH Forschungsgesellschaft mbH, Graz

 Christian Hartmann joined Joanneum Research in November 1996 as a researcher in the field of technology and innovation policy. He is holding a Ph.D. in economics from the Karl-Franzens-University Graz. In his work he is currently heading the research group  technology, foresight and planning at the Centre for Economic and Innovation Research.
 Christian Hartmann has conducted qualitative and quantitative research on R&D and innovation issues in Europe at regional, national and transnational level. In the framework of project related work he is strongly involved in regional and sectoral innovation system research and the development of smart specialisation strategies.

Mag. MBA Anke MERKL-RACHBAUER

Manager, Investor Relations and Location Management, Business Upper Austria - OÖ Wirtschaftsagentur GmbH, Linz

 Since 1996, Mrs. Anke Merkl-Rachbauer has been working as for the Upper Austrian Business Development Agency and is head of the department location development.marketing.communication . This she has almost 20 years of experience in the fields of regional economic and innovation development and cluster-policy.
 
 Anke is responsible for location development and branding of the region of Upper Austria. Prior she was responsible for the coordination of the strategic economic and research programme for Upper Austria, named "Innovative Upper Austria 2010plus". Between 2005 and 2011 she headed the project "Plastics Location Upper Austria", building up strategically the educational & research infrastructure in Upper Austria, accompanied by place branding measures for the plastics location Upper Austria. Placed Branding being defined as an uttermost important topic to attract talented people into the region, she is currently working on a strategy for Upper Austria.

Technologiegespräche

Timetable einblenden

23.08.2012

10:00 - 12:30Technologiebrunch gegeben von Standortagentur TirolSocial
13:00 - 13:10BegrüßungPlenary
13:10 - 13:30Eröffnung der Alpbacher Technologiegespräche 2012Plenary
13:30 - 14:15EröffnungsreferatePlenary
14:15 - 15:05Energie für morgenPlenary
15:25 - 16:55Global Earth Research - Forschung für die Zukunft der Erde in Kooperation mit der Helmholtz-Gemeinschaft Deutscher ForschungszentrenPlenary
16:55 - 17:45Kampf gegen den Krebs - Durchbrüche und ErwartungenPlenary
20:00 - 21:30Produktion und Forschung im globalen Wettbewerb - wer bestimmt die Zukunft?Plenary
21:30 - 23:30Abendempfang gegeben von Forschung AustriaSocial
21:30 - 23:30Karrierelounge - Abendveranstaltung mit Buffet für StudentInnen, JungwissenschaftlerInnen und BerufseinsteigerInnen, gegeben von den Veranstaltern der Alpbacher Technologiegespräche und Siemens AG ÖsterreichSocial

24.08.2012

09:00 - 15:30Arbeitskreis 01: Schlüsseltechnologien - Zukunft für Europas JugendBreakout
09:00 - 15:30Arbeitskreis 02: Chancen und Grenzen von "Ambient Assisted Living"Breakout
09:00 - 15:30Arbeitskreis 03: Smart City - der Mensch im MittelpunktBreakout
09:00 - 15:30Arbeitskreis 04: Demographie und Humankapital als Chance für InnovationBreakout
09:00 - 15:30Arbeitskreis 05: Produktionsstandorte der Zukunft - Entscheidungsfaktoren, Chancen und RisikenBreakout
09:00 - 15:30Arbeitskreis 06: Klettersteig in die wissenschaftliche KarriereBreakout
09:00 - 15:30Arbeitskreis 07: Schlüsselelemente erfolgreicher InnovationskulturenBreakout
09:00 - 15:30Arbeitskreis 08: Lernen durch innovative BildungsnetzwerkeBreakout
09:00 - 15:30Arbeitskreis 09: Gesucht: jung, technisch begabt, wissbegierigBreakout
09:00 - 15:30Arbeitskreis 10: Smart Governance for smart SpecialisationBreakout
09:00 - 15:30Arbeitskreis 11: Medizintechnik: Herausforderungen und ChanceBreakout
09:00 - 15:30Arbeitskreis 12: Cyber-Sicherheit als kritischer StabilitätsfaktorBreakout
09:00 - 15:30Arbeitskreis 13: Moderne Technologien und ihre Rolle in DemokratieprozessenBreakout
09:00 - 18:00Junior Alpbach - Wissenschaft und Technologie für junge MenschenBreakout
09:00 - 15:00Ö1 Kinderuni Alpbach - Wissenschaft und Technologie für KinderBreakout
09:45 - 15:00Sonderveranstaltung: FTI-Internationalisierung in Österreich und der EUBreakout
16:00 - 17:15Individualisierung als Basis für Bildung und InnovationPlenary
17:30 - 19:30Wege zum Nobelpreis - PreisträgerInnen im Gespräch mit österreichischen NachwuchswissenschaftlerInnen in Kooperation mit der Stiftung Lindauer Nobelpreisträgertreffen BodenseePlenary

25.08.2012

09:00 - 10:30Neue Technologien, die unser Leben verändern - Ausgewählte EU "Flagship-Projekte"Plenary
10:45 - 12:00Zukunftsszenarien: in welchen Zeiträumen können wir planen?Plenary
12:00 - 13:05Die Physik des FußballsPlenary
13:05 - 13:15Abschluss-StatementPlenary
13:20 - 14:00Imbiss zum Abschluss der VeranstaltungSocial