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I-Brain – die technologische Evolution des Gehirns?

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Erwin-Schrödinger-Saal
Plenary / Panel
in englischer Sprache

Vortragende

Parlow-Solomon Professor on Aging; Professor of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences; Director, UCLA Center on Aging; Director, Division of Geriatric Psychiatry; Director, Memory & Aging Research Center, Jane & Terry Semel institute for Neuroscience & Human Behavior and the David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles (CA) Abstract
The current explosion of new technology is not only changing the way we live and communicate, it is rapidly and profoundly changing the way we think and how our brains function. Persistent daily exposure to computers, videogames, television, cell phones and other modern devices stimulates brain cell alteration and neurotransmitter release, gradually strengthening new neural pathways in the brain while other neural networks, lacking stimulation, gradually weaken. Young minds tend to be the most exposed, as well as the most sensitive, to the impact of this digital technology, and the effects are both positive and negative. Reaction time and peripheral vision improves, but attention deficit symptoms and technology addiction can affect learning abilities and contribute to behavioral problems. Normal brain development continues through adolescences when frontal circuits mature to master complex reasoning and planning skills, and the emotional brain centers in the temporal lobe strengthen as young people learn empathy, the ability to understand another person's emotional point of view. Today's young digital natives have never known a world without computers, 24-hour TV news, Internet and cell phones. Their brain neural circuitry has mastered this modern technology, but their traditional face-to-face human contact skills are often neglected. By contrast, older digital immigrants adapt to the new technology more slowly - they're reluctant to try the new gadgets and their brains are slower to learn how to use them. Yet, their neural networks controlling direct social interaction are stronger since they grew up in a time when technology was less prevalent and face-to-face conversations more common. As a consequence of the rapidly increasing high-tech stimulation, we are witnessing the beginning of a new kind of generation gap, what I call the brain gap between younger and older minds. In this lecture, I will elucidate this current pivotal point in brain evolution; show how we all - digital natives and digital immigrants alike - can adapt to it; and provide the tools we need in order to take charge of our lives and our brains, while we preserve our humanity and keep up with the latest technology.
Freie Journalistin, Wien Chair

MD Gary SMALL

Parlow-Solomon Professor on Aging; Professor of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences; Director, UCLA Center on Aging; Director, Division of Geriatric Psychiatry; Director, Memory & Aging Research Center, Jane & Terry Semel institute for Neuroscience & Human Behavior and the David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles (CA)

1969-1973 BA in Biology, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA)
1977-1978 MD, University of Southern California School of Medicine
1977-1978 Internship, Internal Medicine, Children's Hospital & Adult Med. Center, S.F., CA
1978-1981 Psychiatry Residency, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA
1969-1973 BA in Biology, University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA)
1977-1978 MD, University of Southern California School of Medicine
1977-1978 Internship, Internal Medicine, Children's Hospital & Adult Med. Center, S.F., CA
1978-1981 Psychiatry Residency, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA
1978-1981 Clinical Fellow in Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School
1981-1983 Geriatric Psychiatry Fellow, UCLA School of Medicine
since 1983 Assistant ( 83) to Associate ( 90) to Full Professor ( 95) of Psychiatry, UCLA
1988-2002 Director, UCLA Geriatric Psychiatry and Psychology Fellowship Program
1997-2007 Director, Imaging Core, UCLA Alzheimer Disease Center
since 2007 Director, Neuroimaging & Biomarkers Core, Easton Alzheimer Research Center
since 1997 Director, UCLA Center on Aging
since 1998 Parlow-Solomon Professor on Aging, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA
since 1998 Director, Memory and Aging Research Center, Semel Institute for Neuroscience
since 2008 Director, Geriatric Psychiatry Division, Department of Psychiatry and Semel Institute

Dr. Gisela HOPFMÜLLER-HLAVAC

Freie Journalistin, Wien

1984-2009 Ressort Innenpolitik in der Radio-Information, ORF - Österreichischer Rundfunk
1991-1997 Ressortleiterin, ORF - Österreichischer Rundfunk
1997-2002 Sendungsverantwortliche "Report", Moderation des politischen TV-Wochenmagazins des ORF "Report"
1999 Sendungsverantwortung für "Report International"
2001 Sendungsverantwortung für "Europa-Panorama"
2002-2005 Moderation von "Modern Times", des Zukunftsmagazins des ORF
2002-2009 Leiterin der Hauptabteilung "Bildung und Zeitgeschehen", ORF - Österreichischer Rundfunk
seit 2009 Freie Journalistin und Moderatorin

Technologiegespräche

Timetable einblenden

27.08.2009

10:00 - 12:30Technologiebrunch der Tiroler ZukunftsstiftungSocial
13:00 - 13:10Eröffnung durch das Europäische Forum AlpbachPlenary
13:10 - 14:00EröffnungsreferatePlenary
14:00 - 16:00Wege aus der Krise - neue Perspektiven durch Forschung und Innovation?Plenary
16:30 - 18:00Die Zukunft der StammzellenforschungPlenary
20:00 - 21:30Blick in die Vergangenheit - das Rätsel unserer HerkunftPlenary
21:30 - 23:30Abendempfang gesponsert durch Forschung Austria in Kooperation mit der GFF und dem BMVITSocial

28.08.2009

09:00 - 15:30Arbeitskreis 01: Können wir unseren Nahrungsmitteln vertrauen?Breakout
09:00 - 15:30Arbeitskreis 02: Forschungs-, technologie- und innovationspolitische (FTI) Strategien im internationalen VergleichBreakout
09:00 - 15:30Arbeitskreis 03: "Säen und Ernten" in der bio(techno-)logischen Forschung: Vom atomaren Bauplan der Proteine zur Entwicklung neuer Arzneimittel und ihrer klinischen AnwendungBreakout
09:00 - 15:30Arbeitskreis 04: Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Engineering - Schlüsseltechnologien des 21. JahrhundertsBreakout
09:00 - 15:30Arbeitskreis 05: Infratech - Krise als ChanceBreakout
09:00 - 15:30Arbeitskreis 06: Kreativität - Treibstoff der Wissensgesellschaft?Breakout
09:00 - 15:30Arbeitskreis 07: Creative Industries vs. Old Economy: Wohin steuert die Wirtschaft?Breakout
09:00 - 15:30Arbeitskreis 08: Universitäten: Verantwortung für die ZukunftBreakout
09:00 - 15:30Arbeitskreis 09: Vertrauen in die Zukunft - Investieren in die ForschungBreakout
09:00 - 15:30Arbeitskreis 10: Digital Government im Spannungsfeld zwischen Bürger und VerwaltungBreakout
09:00 - 15:30Arbeitskreis 11: E-Mobility AustriaBreakout
09:00 - 18:00Junior Alpbach - Wissenschaft und Technologie für junge MenschenBreakout
09:00 - 15:00Technologieworkshop: Trend-Radar Gesellschaftliche EntwicklungenBreakout
09:00 - 15:00Ö1 Kinderuni Alpbach - Wissenschaft und Technologie für KinderBreakout
10:00 - 15:00Sonderveranstaltung: Positionierung Österreichs im internationalen WissensraumBreakout
16:30 - 17:45Kreativität. Wie Kinder lernen - Lernen wie die Kinder?Plenary
18:15 - 20:00Innovative Forschungsstandorte - Regionen im WettbewerbPlenary

29.08.2009

09:30 - 10:45Vertrauen in die Wissenschaft? Integrität in der wissenschaftlichen ForschungPlenary
10:45 - 11:30Die Zukunft des Universums - Perspektiven für Astrophysik und KosmologiePlenary
12:00 - 13:00I-Brain - die technologische Evolution des Gehirns?Plenary
13:00 - 13:15Abschluss-StatementPlenary
13:15 - 14:00Imbiss zum Abschluss der VeranstaltungSocial