zum Inhalt
Header Image

10: How do animals think? Animal cognition in human context

-
Hauptschule
Seminar / Seminar
in englischer Sprache

In „The Descent of Man“ Darwin described the „difference in mental power between the highest ape and the lowest savage“ as „immense“ – but later on the same page he also noted that there was „no fundamental difference between man and the higher mammals in their mental faculties“. Ever since Darwin debate has raged back and forth over the degree of similarity between human and nonhuman thinking. We shall consider this question in light of the latest research on the ability of animals to reason, remember, communicate, form con-cepts, and understand each other’s states of mind.

READING LIST:

Wynne, CDL (2004) Do Animals Think? Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press

Wynne, CDL (2001) Animal Cognition: The Mental Lives of Animals. Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave

Budiansky, S. (1998) If a Lion Could Talk: How Animals Think. London, UK: Wiedenfeld & Nicolson

Vortragende

Professor, Section of Language and Intelligence, Department of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, Primate Research Institute, Kyoto University Chair
Associate Professor, University of Florida, Department of Psychology Chair

Tetsuro MATSUZAWA

Professor, Section of Language and Intelligence, Department of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, Primate Research Institute, Kyoto University

 Has been studying chimpanzee intelligence both in the laboratory and in the wild and tries to synthesize the field work and the laboratory work to understand the nature of chimpanzees
1978 "Ai Project" started and has been focusing on the language-like skills and the concept of numbers established in a female chimpanzee
since 1986 studying the behavior of wild chimpanzees in their natural habitat in Bossou and Nimba, Guinea, West Africa

Dr. Clive D. L. WYNNE

Associate Professor, University of Florida, Department of Psychology

1987-1988 Research Fellow, Duke University, Durham, U.S.A.
1988-1990 Research Fellow, Universität Konstanz, West Germany
1990-1993 Research Associate, Duke University, Durham, U.S.A.
1993-2001 Lecturer /Senior Lecturer, Department of Psychology, University of Western Australia
since 2002 Associate Professor, Department of Psychology, University of Florida

Seminarwoche

Timetable einblenden