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06 Hunger – Values – Politics

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Hauptschule
Breakout / Working Group
english language

European Forum Alpbach in cooperation with the University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna | Centre for Development Research
The reasons and consequences of world hunger are documented. However, there is little consensus about strategies to combat hunger and to secure access to quality food for all. Global players influence the world food system – their economic and political interests shape future food security strategies. The working group will discuss underlying values in political, economic and social domains. Given the mixed experiences of the past, what change in values is needed to achieve sustainable and equitable food systems in the future? How can a balance of interests along the lines of global inequalities be found?

Speakers

Managing Director, GOAL - Global Options and Linkages, Vienna Abstract
1. Values (i.e. what is important to people) drive people to do what they do, and not to do what they know they should do - as in the case of those involved in food and agriculture systems.
2. They are largely driven by egocentric "value memes" (i.e. their way of thinking about their values) - although their worldviews may be ethno- or world-centric.
3. Value memes evolve as people interact and learn from their life conditions and experience; people tend to become increasingly aware and conscious of their changing surroundings be they local, country or world. Such is the nature of transformative change and the path of human evolution.
4. Only one 'thing' is certain: that is, "change" - it is the only thing that is permanent on our planet. Everything and everybody is changing all the time - it is imperative that people be ready, willing and able to surf the waves of change.
5. Many people have already changed their way of thinking about food, agriculture, politics, policy and hunger in the world. They have done so by interacting with and learning from other people in complex systems and adapting to the current interrelated world crises. Everybody can do the same when they accept that reality is always subjective and that nobody is ever either 100% wrong or 100% right.
6. The European Union could play an important role in facilitating the evolution of the food-hunger complex system on the basis of its limited experience with global issues that cannot be tackled by any one country alone, and of its notion of "subsidiarity".
7. This implies a transformative / mindset change by the main stakeholders in the EU to adopt integral, systemic flex-flow value memes and a worldcentric worldview. The EU is taking a first small step in the right direction. Others have taken bigger ones.
Senior Food and Nutrition Security Advisor, NEPAD - New Partnership for Africa's Development, African Union, Johannesburg Abstract
Hunger (and malnutrition) remains one of the most pervasive, silent and elusive of human challenges. Why? In part because it is such a basic human need, we take it for granted. More so, the fact that hunger manifests in different forms (acute, chronic, micronutrient deficiencies) some of which are not overtly felt means that many go hungry without even being aware. At the base of hunger lies an extremely complex nature of the politics behind policies, research, investments, agenda setting, fragmented and weak coordination, programme design and implementation thereof. The result is more hungry, malnourished and less productive populations with far reaching consequences for intergenerational hunger and poverty. Fully appreciating the costs and socio-economic consequences of hunger should spur us to change values, systems, attitude, mindset and approaches to eradicate hunger and malnutrition. There are proven interventions plus effective solutions that we must take to scale.
Professor of Science Policy, University of Sussex Abstract
Chronic under-nutrition is not a consequence of a global scarcity of food, it is a consequence of poverty; it is an economic and social problem not a technological problem.

Governments of OECD countries (and their clients) insist on ‘stabilising’ their agricultural markets, while insisting that governments of poor countries should liberalise theirs; meanwhile there is no money to be made from trying to sell food to people who are too poor to buy it.

Power in the food system does not lie with consumers, nor in many cases with the farmers, but with large corporations in agricultural supply industries, commodity traders, food processors and retailers.

Current approaches neglect at least three key value-laden issues: direction, diversity and distribution (the 3-Ds).

A pro-poor trajectory should be:

- farmer first, bottom-up choice of R&D goals
- socio-economically and cultural sensitive
- employment-generating not labour-displacing
- resilience-enhancing
- dependency-reducing
- affordable and risk reducing
Senior Scientist and Director, CDR - Centre for Development Research, BOKU - University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna Chair

Alexandre DE FARIA

Managing Director, GOAL - Global Options and Linkages, Vienna

1987-1999 Chief, Project Appraisal/Quality Assurance, UNIDO - United Nations Industrial Development Organisation, Vienna
since 2000 Director, Quality Performance, Vienna
since 2011 External Lecturer, Centre for Development Research, BOKU - University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna

Dr. Boitshepo Bibi GIYOSE

Senior Food and Nutrition Security Advisor, NEPAD - New Partnership for Africa's Development, African Union, Johannesburg

1989-1992 Nutritionist, Field Support Officer, Ministry of Health- Food and Nutrition Unit, Gaborone, Botswana
1995-1996 Nutritionist, Information and Research Officer, Ministry of Health, Food and Nutrition Unit, Gaborone, Botswana
1997-1998 Private Consultant, Nutrition and Dietetics, Private Nutrition & Dietetic Practice Gaborone, Botswana
1996-1998 Senior Manager, TOM PTY LTD. Mogotsi Morekwe Mills - Mochudi/Gaborone, Botswana
1998-2003 Coordinator, Food and Nutrition Programme, CRHCS-ECSA Commonwealth Regional Health Community Secretariat for East, Central, & Southern Africa, Arusha, Tanzania
2004-2004 Private International Nutrition Consultant
2004-2005 Coordinator, Small Population Countries in Africa UN Initiative for HIV/AIDS, UNDP/UNAIDS, UN Botswana Country Team
since 2005 Senior Advisor, Food and Nutrition Security, African Union - NEPAD Planning and Coordinating Agency

B.Sc. MA MPhil Ph.D. Erik MILLSTONE

Professor of Science Policy, University of Sussex

1971-1973 Lecturer in Philosophy, Universities of Leeds; University of Nottingham
1973-1986 Lecturer in the History and Social Studies of Science, University of Sussex
1987-1995 Lecturer in Sciece Policy, University of Sussex
1995-2001 Senior Lecturer in Science Policy, University of Sussex
2001-2005 Reader in Science Policy, University of Sussex
2005-2017 Professor of Science Policy, University of Sussex

Dipl.-Ing. Dr. Michael HAUSER

Senior Scientist and Director, CDR - Centre for Development Research, BOKU - University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna

  Studies in Agro-ecology: Vienna and Reading
2001-2009 Assistant Professor, Department of Sustainable Agricultural Systems, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna: Coordination of numerous Development Projects in Asia and Africa
since 2009 Director, CDR - Centre for Development Research, BOKU - University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna
since 2013 President, AGRINATURA - The European Alliance on Agricultural Knowledge for Development

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