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20: Diversity as a driver of resilience to corruption – Dream or reality?

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Hauptschule
Breakout / Law & justice
German and English language

Corruption seriously impedes human rights and sustainable development, exacerbates poverty and increases the costs of doing business. It is a threat to peace, security, and stability with economic, social, political, and cultural dimensions.
Building resilience to this global phenomenon must embrace diverging experiences of various countries and regions, and requires international cooperation and a comprehensive response by the public and private sectors, civil society, academia, and the media.
Thus, what are the features of successful multi-stakeholder approaches against corruption, and can they be replicated globally? How do we deal with the increasing complexity of joint anti-corruption efforts? And how do we square the circle between international norms and local specificities?

Speakers

Executive President, Reporters without Boarders, Vienna
Research Fellow, IACA - International Anti-Corruption Academy, Laxenburg
Chief, Conference Support Section, UNODC - Corruption and Economic Crime Branch, Vienna
Dean and Executive Secretary, IACA - International Anti Corruption Academy, Laxenburg Chair

Ruggero SCATURRO

Research Fellow, IACA - International Anti-Corruption Academy, Laxenburg

since 2007 Research Fellow, International Anti-Corruption Academy, Laxenburg
2009-2014 Bachelor, International Cooperation and Economic Development, University of Palermo, Italy
2015-2017 Master, Human Rights, University of Vienna

Brigitte STROBEL-SHAW

Chief, Conference Support Section, UNODC - Corruption and Economic Crime Branch, Vienna

 From 1998 to 2002, she was posted in South Africa for UNDP and UNODC as programme coordinator for all technical assistance activities in the field of crime prevention and criminal justice, including projects on organized crime, corruption, urban terrorism, juvenile justice and violence against women.
 Brigitte Strobel-Shaw had many positions within the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime in, included work with the Terrorism Prevention Branch, as well as work in the Commission Secretariat and Legal Affairs Branch (CSLAB) on promoting and supporting the entry into force of the UN Convention against Transnational Organized Crime.
 From 2005 until 2010 she was Deputy to the Chief of the Organized Crime and Corruption Section at the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, providing support for the overall management of the Section's programme of work and leading the Section's work on technical assistance in support of the implementation of the UN Convention against Corruption, as well as supporting the political process of establishing an effective review mechanism for the Convention.
 Since 2010 she is heading the Section at the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime that serves as the secretariat for the Mechanism for Reviewing the Implementation of the United Nations Convention against Corruption (UNCAC), the first global peer review mechanism. In addition to the work on country reviews, the Section provides technical assistance in preparation of and during the reviews. It is also responsible for the work on asset recovery which is primarily implemented through the joint UNODC/World Bank Stolen Asset Recovery (StAR) Initiative.

Mag. M.Sc. Martin KREUTNER

Dean and Executive Secretary, IACA - International Anti Corruption Academy, Laxenburg

 Commissioned SOF-Officer Austrian Armed Forces
 Law Studies, University of Innsbruck, Austria
 Master of Science in Policing & Public Order Studies, Leicester, U.K.
 Total of 5 years, missions for the UN to Syria, Lebanon, Albania/Kosovo
 Anti-corruption expert for the Council of Europe, The World Bank, and the UN: evaluation/senior consultancy missions to Afghanistan, Germany, Latvia, Russian Federation et al.

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