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Living with the Machine in the Future

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Erwin-Schrödinger-Saal
Plenary / Panel
german language

Machines exert ever more influence on our lives. In the era of Industry 4.0 intelligent, globally linked machines not only enter our factory buildings but also move into our homes in the form of useful robots and 3D printers. At the same time, digital assistants tell us about our environment or even the whole world. What does that mean for our lives?

Speakers

Head of Corporate Research and Technology, Festo AG & Co KG, Esslingen Abstract
Zukünftige Automatisierungslösungen unterliegen hohen Anforderungen hinsichtlich Vernetzung, Flexibilität und Adaptivität. Diese können durch autonome, selbstlernende und wissensbasierte Systeme mit Einbeziehung der menschlichen Kognition erfüllt werden.

Cyber Physical Systems (CPS) sind Voraussetzung dafür. Sie sind hochintegrierte mechatronische Komponenten, die über leistungsfähige Kommunikationsmodule miteinander und mit den Maschinensteuerungen kommunizieren.

Steuerungssysteme werden konzeptionell von zentralen zu dezentralen Architekturen auf der Basis von mechatronischen Agenten weiterentwickelt. Existierende Lösungen befinden sich im Entwicklungsstadium und werden auf diversen Forschungsplattformen einer Evaluation unterzogen.

Dabei ist die Möglichkeit des Menschen gefragt, direkt und intuitiv mit der Technik zu kommunizieren. Die Technik muss den Menschen verstehen und der Mensch muss die Technik besser verstehen. Anlagen werden intuitives Bedienen gestatten, mobile Endgeräte bis hin zu kollaborationsfähigen Robotern unterstützen aktiv bei manuellen Tätigkeiten im Sinne industrieller Assistenzsysteme.

Für das Verständnis der Funktionsweise moderner Steuerungsarchitekturen und deren Optimierung im ganzheitlichen Kontext sind die holistischen Vorgehensweisen der Mechatronik unter Einbeziehung menschlicher Verhaltensmodelle unerlässlich. Ebenso sind die für Planung und Inbetriebnahme eingesetzten Methoden dringend zu vereinfachen hinsichtlich Handhabung und Aufwand.

Der Blick über den Tellerrand der Technik in die Funktionsmechanismen natürlicher Systeme erschließt die Übertragung von Effizienzstrategien aus der Natur in die moderne Automatisierungstechnik.

Angepasste Qualifizierungskonzepte unterstützen den Menschen bei der Bewältigung der neuen Herausforderungen in der Produktion, die den Menschen nicht außerhalb, sondern im Gegenteil dazu im Mittelpunkt der zukünftigen Produktionsumgebung sieht.

Sensorintegration, Kognition und Kommunikationstechnologien für autonome Systeme sind Impulsgeber für zukünftige Entwicklungen. Es geht um

• Effiziente modellbasierte Funktionenentwicklung
• Angepasste Steuerungsarchitekturen für zentrale/dezentrale Automatisierung
• Mensch-Technik-Interaktion für Inbetriebnahme und Anwendung.
• Einfachheit und Intuition durch gekapselte Komplexität.

Die derzeitigen Aktivitäten im Kontext von Industrie 4.0 geben für zukünftige Anwendungen mit erhöhten Anforderungen an Flexibilität und Adaptivität entscheidende Impulse.
Professor of Cognitive and Computer Science, Bernard M. Gordon Senior Faculty Fellow, Adjunct Professor of Psychology and Director, Human-Robot Interaction Laboratory, Department of Computer Science, School of Engineering, Tufts University, Medford, MA Abstract
As robots are becoming more intelligent and autonomous, new robot applications are coming within reach, from autonomously driving cars, to assistive robots in medical domains, to all kinds of service and entertainment robots. With the envisioned deployment of autonomous robots in human societies, however, comes a new type of challenge that has hitherto not been addressed sufficiently by the robotics and artificial intelligence communities: social interactions in human societies are based on social and moral norms that are deeply ingrained in human cognition and behavior. Failing to abide by those norms will cause different types of societal reactions to offending behavior, from blame and reprimands in simple cases, all the way to full-fledged legal processes.

In this presentation, I will start by making the case that intelligent autonomous robots will cause people to project agency into machines and as a result people will automatically form expectations about robots' social and moral abilities. Hence, failing to incorporate such capabilities into robotic control architectures, will not only disappoint human expectations and cause people to make wrong predictions about robot behaviors, but ultimately will result in unnecessary harm to humans. Using simple case studies, I will briefly illustrate the potential dangers of deploying robots without some rudimentary "moral competence". And I will also mention recent efforts to describe what is needed to develop such rudimentary moral competence in autonomous robots, ending the presentation with a plea to engineers, scientists, philosophers, and legal experts to engage in a discussion of how we can move autonomous technology forward without sacrificing essential values of human societies.
Professor for Autonomous Systems and Director, Institute of Robotics and Intelligent Systems, ETH - Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich
Technical Advisor for Complex IT Solutions and Technical Director S&D in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland, IBM Deutschland GmbH, Ehningen Abstract
The rapid digitization of information is generating unprecedented quantities of data. On a global basis, we now create more than 2,5 billion gigabytes of data each day, with 80 percent of it in an "unstructured" format, including blogs and texts, audio and video transmissions, and a constant stream of signals from embedded senors and wearable technology.

Traditional computing systems, individually programmed, are unable to exploit this resource. In combination with human expertise and cognitive computing technology has the potential to solve previously unsolvable problems and to transform companies, industries, goverments and private social life.

Cognitive computing is able to figure out informations and contection to which no one has thought of before. This leads to a transparency of individuals and communities, which is not desired in this form. Cognition computing we see today not only in research and in the economy, but it is an ingredient in many areas of our daily lives. Social platforms, cloud services for headhunters and companies, personality profiles and consultants, and it increasingly influences more and more our personal life and opinion.

These are pros and cons about it for an excellent debate.
Chief Executive Officer, DIE ZEIT; Managing Director, DvH Medien GmbH Chair

Dr. Peter POST

Head of Corporate Research and Technology, Festo AG & Co KG, Esslingen

 Prof. Dr. Peter Post started his professional career with an apprenticeship as a toolmaker, and continued his studies to get a degree in mechanical engineering at the University of Siegen, Germany. He finished his work as research assistant in Siegen with a doctoral degree. Since 1989 he is working at Festo AG & Co. KG in Esslingen/Germany in several functions in R&D. Since 2008 he is in charge of corporate research and technology. He is an active member in several scientific networks and clusters for applied research in production and manufacturing within Germany (e. g. Industry 4.0) and Europe (e. g. Manufuture, EFFRA).

Ph.D. Ph.D. Matthias SCHEUTZ

Professor of Cognitive and Computer Science, Bernard M. Gordon Senior Faculty Fellow, Adjunct Professor of Psychology and Director, Human-Robot Interaction Laboratory, Department of Computer Science, School of Engineering, Tufts University, Medford, MA

 Professor in Cognitive and Computer Science in the Department of Computer Science at Tufts and an Adjunct Professor in the Department of Psychology at Tufts University as well as the School of Informatics and Computing at Indiana University.
 He is also the Bernard M. Gordon Senior Faculty Fellow in Engineering and Director of the Human-Robot Interaction Laboratory at Tufts.
 He earned a Ph.D. in Philosophy from the University of Vienna in 1995 and a Joint Ph.D. in Cognitive Science and Computer Science from Indiana University Bloomington in 1999.
 His research focuses on complex cognitive and affective robots with natural language capabilities for natural human-robot interaction and most recently on developing computational mechanisms for endowing robots with rudimentary moral competence.

Dr. Roland Yves SIEGWART

Professor for Autonomous Systems and Director, Institute of Robotics and Intelligent Systems, ETH - Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich

1984 Master, Mechanical Engineering, ETH Zurich - Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich
1984-1985 Research and Teaching Assistant, Turbomachinery Lab (Prof. Gyarmathy), ETH Zurich - Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich
1985-1986 Lecturer, Turbomachinery, Technical University (HTL), Zurich
1985-1989 Research and Teaching Assistant, Institute of Mechanics (Prof. Schweitzer), ETH Zurich - Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich
1989 PhD, Mechanical Engineering, ETH Zurich - Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich
1989-1990 Post-Doc, CDR - Center of Design and Research, Stanford University, California
1990-1996 Senior Scientist and Lecturer, Institute of Robotics, ETH Zurich - Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich
1990-1997 Vice-President Research & Development, MECOS Traxler AG
1996-2006 Associate / Full Professor in Microengineering, EPFL - École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne
2002-2006 Vice Dean, School of Engineering (STI), EPFL - École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne
2005 Visiting Professor, NASA Ames and Stanford University, California
since 2006 Full Professor for Autonomous Systems, ETH Zurich - Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich
2010-2014 Vice President Research and Corporate Relations, ETH Zurich - Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich
since 2015 Co-Director of Wyss Translational Center Zürich

Ingolf WITTMANN

Technical Advisor for Complex IT Solutions and Technical Director S&D in Germany, Austria, and Switzerland, IBM Deutschland GmbH, Ehningen

 Studied computer science and business administration and started his professional career as Unix system engineer at Nixdorf.
 In 1990 he joined IBM starting as AIX marketeer following the IBM classical career as Unix sales representative, solutions sales manager, and different national and international technical director positions. Ingolf is now the Technical Director for IBM DACH (Germany, Austria, and Switzerland). He is member of the DACH Technical Leadership Team and is responsible for the profession development cross organization.
 Since 2007 Ingolf is the chairman of the department "IT Infrastructure & Digital Office" in the German Association for Information Technology, Telecommunications and New Media (BITKOM).

Dr. Rainer ESSER

Chief Executive Officer, DIE ZEIT; Managing Director, DvH Medien GmbH

1975-1977 Trainee with Deutsche Bank AG in Hannover
1977-1982 Law Studies in Munich, Geneva and London
1982-1983 Master of Law the University of Gerogia in Athens, USA
1986 Second Legal State Examination
1986-1987 Education as Editor at Deutsche Journalistenschule (German Journalists School) in Munich
  Stegemann, Sieveking & Lutteroth, Hamburg
1987-1989 Lawyer at the international law offices Nörr, Stiefenhofer & Lutz, Munich and
1989 PhD in International Law at the University of Regensburg
1989-1992 Editor in Chief at Bertelsmann International, Munich (Spotlight, Ecoute, ECOS and ADESSO)
1995-1999 Managing Director of Main-Post Publishing House, Würzburg
since 1999 CEO of DIE ZEIT
since 2011 Managing Director of DvH Medien GmbH (DIE ZEIT, Verlagsgruppe Handelsblatt, Tagesspiegel)

Technology Symposium

show timetable

27.08.2015

10:00 - 12:30Technology BrunchSocial
13:00 - 13:10Opening of the Alpbach Technology Symposium 2015Plenary
13:10 - 14:00RTI Policy TalkPlenary
14:00 - 15:30Living with the Machine in the FuturePlenary
16:00 - 17:30Cyber Physical SystemsPlenary
19:45 - 21:15Regional Debate Central Eastern EuropePlenary
21:15 - 23:30Career LoungeSocial
21:15 - 23:30Evening ReceptionSocial

28.08.2015

09:00 - 10:30BioeconomyPlenary
09:00 - 18:00Junior Alpbach - Science and Technology for Young PeopleBreakout
09:00 - 15:00Ö1 Children's University Alpbach - Science and Technology for KidsBreakout
10:50 - 12:15Complexity SciencePlenary
12:15 - 13:00Lunch Snacks for the Participants of the Breakout SessionSocial
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 01: 2015: The End of Energy RevolutionBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 02: Bio-Economy in Action: National Bio-Economy Strategies in ComparisonBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 03: Human Enhancement Technologies: Amplifying or Reducing InequalityBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 04: Research Promotion at the Interfaces of Risk, Creativity and MainstreamBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 05: Market Upheavals: Challenges and Opportunities for Innovation?Breakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 06: Entrepreneurship: What Can Science Contribute?Breakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 07: Games of InEqualityBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 08: Physical Internet: A Seismic Shift for Logistics and MobilityBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 09: Dynamics by Heterogeneity: How Economy and Research Profit from DiversityBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 10: Energy Transition: Same Goal - Different WaysBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 11: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells: A Market Breakthrough Ahead?Breakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 12: A Bright Future? Challenges and Opportunities for LED LightingBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 13: Truth and Reality: The Importance of Models in Economy, Science and PhilosophyBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 14: Virtual Learning: InEquality in Education?Breakout
20:00 - 21:30Urban Innovators Challenge - Start Up Your CompanyPartner

29.08.2015

09:00 - 10:30MIT and its Media Lab, Special Guest at this Year's Technology SymposiumPlenary
10:30 - 11:30InEquality: The New Silk RoadPlenary
11:50 - 13:15Art, Design and Architecture as a Laboratory of Digital ModernityPlenary
13:15 - 13:30Closing Statement of the Alpbach Technology SymposiumPlenary
13:30 - 14:00Snack ReceptionSocial