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04: Security concepts and the field – Papers versus reality

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Hauptschule
Seminar / Seminar
english language

The most modern concepts of security have shifted focus from old-style wars to internal violence, and recognize a much wider range of potential threats and risks to mankind. Europe is often seen as the most ‘modern’ continent in this sense, since it has largely moved beyond the older dangers to peace and is grappling with the new ones through a unique model of multi-state integration. Yet Europe also offers food for thought on how persistent the phenomena of violence, accidents, mistakes and other human vulnerabilities can be, not least because the human and political drivers behind them change so slowly. It invites reflection on how the finest principles and agreements on security cooperation can be cast aside in the heat of events on the ground, and shaken by brutal episodes like the war in Georgia.

This seminar has a dual focus: on the general evolution of security challenges and the scope for nations to cope with them, both at home and through cooperation: and on the Organization for Security and Coooperation in Europe (OSCE) as a mirror of Europe’s own solved and unsolved security agendas. The two seminar leaders will talk the topics through from basic principles to an up-to-date analysis of European policy options, giving plentiful opportunity for class discussion and interactive work on the way.

DAY ONE

– Teachers’ introduction: plans, methods and rules of the road
– Defining ‘security’ in the twentieth century: a first overview of concepts and challenges
– The ‘comprehensive’ security concept of the OSCE, past and present, including an introduction to OSCE’s modes of operation

DAY TWO (AB)

– Three basic methods of security action: intervention, regulation, integration  with critical discussion of strengths, weaknesses and the potential for a discourse/reality gap
– Practical challenges for developing a national  strategy , with special attention to the problems of small states and including a short talk-through exercise

DAY THREE

– Defining the European security agenda today
– Principles, agenda and roles of the OSCE

DAY FOUR

– Presentation and debate on conflict management in the greater Europe, including a scenario exercise

DAY FIVE

– Roles and strategies of other European security institutions (EU, NATO, Council of Europe, sub-regional groups etc); which way is the ‘security architecture’ shifting??
– Europe’ s role in the world: is there a ‘European strategy’ or strategic identity?

DAY SIX

– Open debate on the future of OSCE and cooperative security in Europe
– Wrap-up discussion on learnings and personal reactions, including any lessons for Austria

Speakers

Senior Operational Advisor, Conflict Prevention Centre, OSCE - The Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe, Vienna Chair
Former Director, SIPRI - Stockholm International Peace Research Institute; Visiting Professor, Faculty of Political Science, University of Iceland, Reykjavik Chair

Ph.D. Alice ACKERMANN

Senior Operational Advisor, Conflict Prevention Centre, OSCE - The Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe, Vienna

1992-1993 Assistant Professor, Washington State University, Pullman, Washington
1993-2000 Assistant Professor, University of Miami, School of International Studies, Miami
2001 Visiting Lecturer, Department of Politics (Peace Studies Programme), Lancaster University, UK
2001-2005 Professor, George C. Marshall European Center for Security Studies - German - U.S. Governmental Institution, Garmisch-Partenkirchen
2004 Political Officer (on exchange), U.S. Mission to the OSCE, Vienna
2005-2007 Policy Support Officer, South Eastern Europe Desk, Policy Support Service, Conflict Prevention Centre, OSCE Secretariat, Vienna
since 2007 Senior Advisor, Planning and Analysis/Operations Service, Conflict Prevention Centre, OSCE Secretariat, Vienna

MA Alyson Judith Kirtley BAILES

Former Director, SIPRI - Stockholm International Peace Research Institute; Visiting Professor, Faculty of Political Science, University of Iceland, Reykjavik

1971 MA (honours) in Modern History, University of Oxford
1969-1992 British Diplomatic Service, including postings at Budapest, UK Delegation at NATO, Bonn, Beijing, Oslo, and Helsinki (as British Ambassador 2000-2002)
1994-1996 Head, Security Policy Department, Foreign and Commonwealth Office, London
2002-2007 Director of the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute (SIPRI)
 During career breaks and sabbaticals I worked as a researcher at the Royal Institute of International Affairs (Chatham House) in London, as a Vice President at the EastWest Center in New York and as Political Director of Western European Union in Brussels
since 2007 Visiting Professor, Faculty of Political Science, University of Iceland at Reykjavik

Seminar Week

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