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Optogenetics

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Elisabeth-Herz-Kremenak-Saal
Plenary / Keynote & Panel
english language

Optogenetics uses light-controlled “switches” within genetically modified cells, e.g. to control the electrical impulses of nerve cells. In this way, certain neural functions can be controlled remotely and highly complex neural circuits and processes in the brain such as thoughts, perceptions or feelings can be explored.

Speakers

Waynflete Professor of Physiology and Director, Centre for Neural Circuits and Behaviour, University of Oxford Abstract
In optogenetics, cells are genetically modified to become controllable by light. The development of optogenetics addressed a deep and longstanding scientific challenge. In order to understand how the brain works, it is crucial for scientists to control neural activity-and to do so precisely, by targeting well-defined groups of nerve cells, while observing the consequences for organismal physiology and behavior. We achieve this goal by instructing specific cells to produce light-activated proteins that modulate the cells' electrical signals.
In a decade and a half, optogenetic control of neuronal activity has developed from a far-fetched idea to a widely used experimental technique. My talk will recount how this happened, drawing on the earliest and latest results from my lab. To illustrate what is now possible, I will present recent work on the regulation of sleep.
Shell Professor of Chemical Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge Chair

Dr. Gero MIESENBÖCK

Waynflete Professor of Physiology and Director, Centre for Neural Circuits and Behaviour, University of Oxford

1983-1991 University of Innsbruck Medical School
1992-1998 Postdoctoral Fellow, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York
1999-2004 Assistant Professor, Cell Biology and Genetics and Neuroscience, Cornell University, Ithaca (NY)
1999-2004 Assistant Member and Head, Laboratory of Neural Systems, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York
2004-2007 Associate Professor, Cell Biology and Cellular and Molecular Physiology, Yale University School of Medicine
since 2007 Waynflete Professor of Physiology, University of Oxford
since 2011 Director, Centre for Neural Circuits and Behaviour, University of Oxford

Ph.D. Lynn Faith GLADDEN

Shell Professor of Chemical Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge

1979-1982 Chemical Physics, University of Bristol
1982-1983 Post-Graduate Certificate in Education, University of Oxford
1983-1987 Ph.D. research, Department of Physical Chemistry, University of Cambridge
1983-1986 British Petroleum Ph.D. Scholarship Award
1987 Ph.D. Thesis, Structural Studies of Inorganic Glasses
1987-1991 University Assistant Lecturer (UAL), Dept. of Chemical Engineering, University of Cambridge
1991-1995 University Lecturer (UL), Dept. of Chemical Engineering, University of Cambridge
1995-1999 Reader, Process Engineering Science, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, University of Cambridge
1999 Professor of Chemical Engineering Science, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, University of Cambridge
2004 Elected to the Shell Professorship of Chemical Engineering, University of Cambridge
2006-2008 Head, Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Cambridge
2008-2010 Head, Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge
2010-2015 Pro-Vice-Chancellor for Research, University of Cambridge

Technology Symposium

show timetable

24.08.2017

11:00 - 11:45#ART TEC: Interfaces between art, technology, and scienceCulture
12:00 - 13:00Opening of exhibitions - Tec-Xperience RoomPartner
13:00 - 13:10OpeningPlenary
13:10 - 14:15RTI TalkPlenary
14:15 - 15:45The robots are coming. Be (not) afraid!Plenary
16:15 - 17:45New materials and autonomous systemsPlenary
20:15 - 21:15Tickets to Berlin: Falling Walls Lab Austria and Summer School on EntrepreneurshipPlenary
21:15 - 23:00Career LoungePlenary
21:30 - 23:30Evening ReceptionSocial

25.08.2017

08:30 - 09:00TU Austria Innovation Marathon: ideas made to order - 24 hours nonstopPlenary
09:00 - 18:00Junior Alpbach - Science and Technology for Young PeopleBreakout
09:00 - 15:00Ö1 Children's University Alpbach - Science and Technology for KidsBreakout
09:15 - 10:00OptogeneticsPlenary
10:30 - 12:15Designing the next digital revolution. At the crossroads of science, technology and artPlenary
12:30 - 13:00Lunch Snacks for the Participants of the Breakout SessionsSocial
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 01: Digital futures: design as key to future digital worldsBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 02: The promotion of research and innovation in Austria: governance between management and autonomyBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 03: Data-driven innovation - from resources to strategiesBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 04: Open science, dark knowledge: science in an age of ignoranceBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 05: Second machine age: learning machines - autonomous machinesBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 06: From the lab to the plate - the vegan black pudding (Blunzengröstl)Breakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 07: Does industry 4.0 need education and training 4.0?Breakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 08: Smart production and servicesBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 09: Conflict and cooperation in the era of digitisationBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 10: The Paris lifestyle - technologies and opportunities for climate protectionBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 11: Conflict, cooperation - or both: how does innovation occur?Breakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 12: The competition for resources as a driver of green technologiesBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 13: A new Biedermeier in Europe?Breakout
18:30 - 19:30China Manufacturing 2025: putting industrial policy ahead of market forces?Plenary

26.08.2017

09:00 - 10:30Managing complex systemsPlenary
10:50 - 12:15The second quantum revolution?Plenary
12:15 - 13:00Gravitational wavesPlenary
13:00 - 14:00Snack ReceptionSocial