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Bioökonomie

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Erwin-Schrödinger-Saal
Plenary / Panel
in deutscher Sprache

Die Tatsache, dass Wachstum nicht ewig währt und Ressourcen begrenzt sind, hat schon viele Hochkulturen untergehen lassen. Die Erderwärmung sowie drohende Engpässe in der Welternährung und Energieversorgung verlangen bessere, nachhaltigere und ausgewogenere Wirtschaftsmodelle. Die Bioökonomie greift dafür auf lebende Systeme zurück, die über Jahrmillionen der Evolution entstanden sind.

Vortragende

Junior Scientist, Bioresources, Department Health & Environment, AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Vienna Abstract
Today’s agriculture is facing a range of serious challenges: extreme weather events, the occurrence of crop pests and diseases and environmental degradation are the main causes for yield loss all over the world. To address these manifold issues it is necessary to develop efficient and yet sustainable technologies supporting agricultural production. This field of action is recognized as an integral part of a bio-based economy.
One approach is to consider beneficial plant-associated microorganisms. As shown for example for mycorrhizal fungi, rhizobial nodule bacteria and many other plant growth-promoting bacteria, these microorganisms play a substantial role in plant growth, stress resilience and health. The application of such beneficial microorganisms in agriculture can thus improve the crop performance and yield and is a promising alternative to chemical fertilizers and pesticides.
A major obstacle to using the microbial potential is their susceptibility during storage or delivery to the field, where their viability suffers from environmental factors such as sunlight and temperature fluctuations. Moreover, the competition by other soil microorganisms makes it difficult for the introduced microorganisms to establish large populations. Therefore, it is crucial to develop a suitable formulation for their protection. We engineer tiny capsules made of cheap, readily available and bio-degradable materials, for example alginate or gelatine. The microorganisms are immobilized inside these capsules along with different protecting substances and dried. They are thus maintained in a resistant and dormant state, similar to an „artificial spore“. The capsules are coated onto seeds prior to sowing.
Upon contact with soil moisture, the microorganisms are activated and set free from the degrading capsule, readily colonizing the developing seedling. They unfold their beneficial effects from an early stage of the young crop’s life cycle, reducing the need of agrochemicals and increasing the plant’s resilience. This will contribute to a sustainable agricultural production, which benefits farmers, consumers and the environment alike.
Founder, ZERI Network; Author "The Blue Economy: Report to the Club of Rome", Tokyo Abstract
The world economy is today not capable of responding the needs of all people and certainly is not aware of the needs of Nature as we note from the harsh statistics that confirm that 2 billion live in poverty and misery and over a billion youth are in search of a job - they are likely to never find. We need to dramatically improve our capacity to fulfil the basic needs of everyone with available resources. The wealth of culture, tradition and art is an integral part of this challenge

The challenge we face is that few master the art to imagine the web that could unfold. The challenge we face is that few can design a local economy so that these obvious opportunities for people and the ecosystem can unfold. It is regrettable that so many young professionals dream of obtaining an MBA (Master of Business Administration) where they will learn to focus on one business built on one competence, and make abstraction of the web of life. The world needs those who can start a chain reaction initiated by the awareness that what is locally available can generate more food, feed, matter and energy, beauty and health than was considered possible by an economist or that could ever be reflected in a business plan.
Head, Plant Sciences, Institute of Bio- and Geosciences, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH; Chairman, BioSC - Bioeconomy Science Center, Jülich Abstract
The rapidly increasing demand for sustainable production of biomass and of security of food and feed availability as well as increasing demands for non-fossil alternatives for chemicals, materials and energy provide the basis for the globally developing field of bioeconomy. FAO’s projections predict that the world’s population will increase to 9 billion in 2050 and this and the associated changes of standard of living (especially consumption of meat) will make it necessary to produce 75% more biomass for food purposes alone. Additionally demands for bio-based renewable resources for chemicals and materials and the request for sustainable bioenergy sources as part of the energy challenge demand significant additional biomass. At the same time land for agricultural use cannot be increased without intolerable consequences for natural resources and sustainability and already present practices often overuse and thus run down soils and water resources.
In order to address these societal challenges, research for a sustainable bioeconomy needs to utilise all available options for innovation and integrate technical with socio-economic approaches. The talk will address the need for crossing borders in two dimensions: (1) I will describe lessons-learned from the Bioeconomy Science Center (BioSC). BioSC focusses on solutions for a sustainable bioeconomy by integrating its four research fields: Sustainable plant production and resource stewardship - Microbial and molecular transformation - Chemical engineering and processing of renewable resources - Economy and social implications of the bioeconomy. (2) In a second example I will describe, how technological innovation in plant sciences for improved efficiency to use natural resources can benefit from integration of technologies and from cross-fertilization from non-plant science cooperation.
In the last section of the talk, I will address opportunities and hurdles in implementing bioeconomy-based solutions.
Professor, Department for Economic and Technological Change, and Director, Center for Development Research, University of Bonn Abstract
Bioeconomy means ‘biologisation’ of the economy as an economy-wide and industrial strategy. This presentation reviews the rapid move towards bioeconomy strategies around the world and related Research and Development (R&D) investments and public science policy. It assesses the driving forces of these developments and the implications for international agricultural change and food security. The future of humankind will strongly depend on a secure and safe availability of food, energy, water, and industrial raw materials, which should be increasingly based on renewable resources. This puts the bioeconomy - the emerging cross-cutting economic sector that produces, transforms, and uses bio-based materials and products - at the center of sustainable economic strategies. Bioeconomy may generate new competitions for biomass; on the other hand, biology based product and process innovations offer new complementarities and synergies. The former may adversely impact food security, while the latter may enhance economic efficiency and environmental sustainability. The presentation takes a holistic view to identify the synergies between technologies, creation of new links in and between value chains (e.g. production of bio-chemicals alongside production of biofuels, use for waste products of other bio-based products in chemical- and building materials industries). The presentation concludes that increased science and technology (S&T) investments are needed to tap the economy-wide opportunities of bioeconomy, and ill-designed bio-fuels policies need to be corrected, in order to facilitate a bioeconomy without adverse externalities for food security.
Chairman of the Board of Trustees, Falling Walls Foundation gGmbH, Berlin Chair

DI Teresa BERNINGER

Junior Scientist, Bioresources, Department Health & Environment, AIT Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Vienna

2007-2011 Study program Nutritional Science and Home Economics at Justus Liebig University Gießen, Germany
2010 Intern at AGES (Austrian Agency for Health and Food Safety), Inssbruck
2011 Intern at FOEME (Friends of the Earth Middle East), Al Auja
  Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Tulln
2011-2013 Study program Agrobiology at BOKU University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna and
  Austrian Institute of Technology GmbH, Tulln
since 2013 Doctoral study program at BOKU University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna

Gunter PAULI

Founder, ZERI Network; Author "The Blue Economy: Report to the Club of Rome", Tokyo

 Bachelors, Economics
 Master of Business Administration
 Honorary Masters, Ecodesign, Faculty of Architecture, School of Design, Politecnico di Torino
 Doctor honoris causa, Management and Economic Development, University of Pécs
 Visiting Professor, Politecnico di Torino and Instituto Tecnológico de Monterrey
 Chair, Nobel Laureates in Science Conference, organised by Elie Wiesel (Jordan)
 Fellow, World Academy of Arts and Sciences, USA
since 1981 created 12 companies, 2 failed
1991-1993 relaunched a small detergent company
since 1994 Leader, ZERI network of scientists and scholars
since 2009 Supporting Blue Economy Projects
since 2013 Chairman, Board of Novamont

Dr. Ulrich SCHURR

Head, Plant Sciences, Institute of Bio- and Geosciences, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH; Chairman, BioSC - Bioeconomy Science Center, Jülich

1982-1988 Studies Biology, University Bayreuth
1988-1991 Ph.D., University Bayreuth
1991-2001 Group Leader, Institute for Botany, University Heidelberg
2001 Habilitation, Botany, University Heidelberg
since 2001 Forschungszentrum Jülich
2001-2011 Director, ICG - Institute for Chemistry and Dynamics of the Geosphere, ICG-4: Phytosphere
since 2011 Director, IBG - Institute for Bio- and Geosciences, IBG-2: Plant Sciences
2004-2011 Member, Executive Board, EPSO - European Plant Science Organization
2006-2008 Research Director, Research Area Earth and Environment, Forschungszentrum Jülich
since 2006 Member, Executive Board, European Technology Platform Plants for the Future
2006 Founder, JPPC - Jülich Plant Phenotyping Center
2007-2012 Member, Steering Committee, European Technology Platform Biofuels
since 2007 Member, Directorate, KoGa - Competence Center for Horticulture
2008-2011 Vice President, EPSO - European Plant Science Organization
since 2009 Spokesman, IPPN - International Plant Phenotyping Network
since 2010 Chairman, BioSC - Bioeconomy Science Centers
since 2011 Coordinator, Cross-Program Activity Sustainable Bioeconomy, Helmholtz Association
since 2012 Coordinator, EPPN - European Plant Phenotyping Network
since 2012 German Head, LABEX Germany of EMBRAPA (Brazilian Agro Research Organization)
since 2012 Member, Science Advisory Board, German Association for the Support of Private German Plant Breeding
since 2012 Chief Executive Officer, QS Science Fund - Fruits, Vegetables and Potato
since 2012 Member, CEPLAS - Center of Excellence in Plant Sciences
since 2012 Coordinator, DPPN - German Plant Phenotyping Network
  Europe, Government of the Federal Republic of Germany
since 2013 Senior Official, EU-CELAC - workgroup Bioeconomy in the cooperation process between Latin America and
since 2013 Programme Speaker, Helmholtz Programme Key Technologies for the Bioeconomy
since 2014 Chairman of the European Technology Platform Plants for the Future

Dr. Dr. h.c. Joachim VON BRAUN

Professor, Department for Economic and Technological Change, and Director, Center for Development Research, University of Bonn

1975 Dipl. Ing. Agriculture, University of Bonn
1975-1980 Research Associate, Faculty of Agriculture, Institute of Agricultural Economics, University of Göttingen
1978 Doctoral Degree, Agricultural Economics, University of Göttingen
1979-1980 Visiting Fellow, Institute of National Planning, Cairo
1981-1982 Research Fellow, IFPRI - International Food Policy Research Institute, Washington DC
1982-1983 Assistant Professor, Institute of Agricultural Economics, University of Göttingen, Germany
1984-1990 Research Fellow, IFPRI - International Food Policy Research Institute, Washington DC
1990-1993 Director, Food Consumption and Nutrition Division, IFPRI - International Food Policy Research Institute, Washington DC
1993-1997 Professor, Food Economics, Food Policy, and World Food Issues; and Director, Institute for Food Economics and Consumer Analyses, Faculty of Agriculture, University of Kiel
1997-2002 Director; Chair of Department and Professor, Economics and Technical Change, ZEF - Center for Development Research, University of Bonn
2002-2009 Director General, IFPRI - International Food Policy Research Institute, Washington DC
since 2009 Director; Chair of Department and Professor, Economics and Technical Change, ZEF - Center for Development Research, University of Bonn

Dr. Jürgen MLYNEK

Chairman of the Board of Trustees, Falling Walls Foundation gGmbH, Berlin

1970-1976 Studium der Physik an der Technischen Universität Hannover und an der Ecole Polytechnique, Paris
1976-1981 Hauptdiplom in Physik und Wissenschaftlicher Assistent, Institut für Angewandte Physik, Universität Hannover
1979 Promotion zum Dr. rer. nat., Universität Hannover
1982 Post-Doktorand, IBM Research Laboratory, San Jose (USA)
1984 Habilitation, Universität Hannover
1983-1985 Hochschulassistent (C1), Universität Hannover
1985-1986 Heisenberg-Stipendiat der Deutschen Forschungsgemeinschaft
1986-1990 Assistenzprofessor an der Eidgenössischen Technischen Hochschule (ETH) Zürich
1990-2000 Ordentlicher Professor (C4) für Experimentalphysik an der Universität Konstanz
1996-2001 Vizepräsident der Deutschen Forschungsgemeinschaft
2000-2005 Präsident der Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin
2005-2015 Präsident der Helmholtz-Gemeinschaft Deutscher Forschungszentren
seit 2015 Chairman of the Board of Trustees, Falling Walls Foundation gGmbH, Berlin

Technologiegespräche

Timetable einblenden

27.08.2015

10:00 - 12:30TechnologiebrunchSocial
13:00 - 13:10Eröffnung der Alpbacher Technologiegespräche 2015Plenary
13:10 - 14:00FTI-TalkPlenary
14:00 - 15:30Zukünftiges Leben mit der MaschinePlenary
16:00 - 17:30Cyber Physikalische SystemePlenary
19:45 - 21:15Regional Debate Central Eastern EuropePlenary
21:15 - 23:30AbendempfangSocial
21:15 - 23:30KarriereloungeSocial

28.08.2015

09:00 - 10:30BioökonomiePlenary
09:00 - 18:00Junior Alpbach - Wissenschaft und Technologie für junge MenschenBreakout
09:00 - 15:00Ö1 Kinderuni Alpbach - Wissenschaft und Technologie für KinderBreakout
10:50 - 12:15Complexity SciencePlenary
12:15 - 13:00Imbiss für die TeilnehmerInnen der Breakout SessionsSocial
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 01: 2015: Das Ende der EnergiewendeBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 02: Bio-Economy in Action: Nationale Bioökonomie-Strategien im VergleichBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 03: Human Enhancement Technologien: Verstärkung oder Reduktion von UngleichheitBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 04: Forschungsförderung zwischen Risiko, Kreativität und MainstreamBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 05: Marktumbrüche: Herausforderung und Chance für Innovation?Breakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 06: Entrepreneurship: Was kann das Wissenschaftssystem beitragen?Breakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 07: Spiele der UnGleichheitBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 08: Physisches Internet: Überragende Vision für Logistik und MobilitätBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 09: Dynamik durch Heterogenität: Wie Wirtschaft und Forschung von Unterschieden profitierenBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 10: Energiewende: Gleiches Ziel - ungleicher WegBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 11: Wasserstoff und Brennstoffzelle: Kommt der Marktdurchbruch?Breakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 12: Leuchtende Zukunft? Herausforderungen und Chancen der LED-BeleuchtungBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 13: Wahrheit und Wirklichkeit: Zur Bedeutung von Modellen in Ökonomie, Wissenschaft und PhilosophieBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 14: Virtuelles Lernen: Chancen(Un)Gleichheit im Bildungsbereich?Breakout
20:00 - 21:30Urban Innovators Challenge - Start Up Your CompanyPartner

29.08.2015

09:00 - 10:30Das Media Lab des MIT zu Gast bei den TechnologiegesprächenPlenary
10:30 - 11:30UnGleichheit: Die neue SeidenstraßePlenary
11:50 - 13:15Kunst, Design und Architektur als Labor der Digitalen ModernePlenary
13:15 - 13:30Abschluss-Statement der Alpbacher TechnologiegesprächePlenary
13:30 - 14:00Imbiss zum Abschluss der VeranstaltungSocial