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02: Bio-Economy in Action: Nationale Bioökonomie-Strategien im Vergleich

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Hauptschule
Breakout / Working Group
in englischer Sprache

Im Fokus steht ein Vergleich der verschiedenen nationalen Bioökonomie-Ansätze (Deutschland, Finnland, Italien, Indien, USA) und die Diskussion möglicher Entwicklungspfade für eine österreichische Bioökonomie-Strategie. Derzeit konzentriert sich Österreich auf den Forschungs- und Innovationsbereich; für eine breite politische sowie gesellschaftliche Verankerung bedarf es weiterer Schritte, die mit internationalen ExpertInnen diskutiert werden sollen.

Vortragende

Rector, BOKU - University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences; President, BIOS Science Austria, Vienna Abstract
Austria’s bioeconomy sectors currently generate approximately 8 % of GDP and employ 230,000 people. This share ought to be increased significantly since today’s fossil-based economy poses major challenges to the international community. Climate change, the growing world population and its supply with food, environmental pollution as well as the increasing scarcity of resources are to be overcome throughout the 21st century. Biogenic, renewable resources can play a key role in reaching a low-carbon, resource-efficient society and a clean economy. At present, Austria highly depends on fossil fuels, yet is determined to make a sustainable, innovative future reality and has therefore set the course for bioeconomy.

In winter 2013 the Austrian Government included bioeconomy in its Work Programme 2013-18 and several months later mandated the inter-ministerial Work Group on climate change and scarce resources to draft an up-to-date report on the field of research, technology and innovation (RTI). This report was subject to consultation by stakeholders at national level this summer, thus allowing to present initial results at European Forum Alpbach. Based on the final report, an Austrian RTI bioeconomy strategy shall be derived and moreover a national bioeconomy action plan developed.
Principal Scientist and Program Manager, Bioeconomy Transformation Program, VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Abstract
The need for a national bioeconomy strategy for Finland was highlighted in a report by Ministry of Employment and the Economy in 2011. The strategy process was initiated in 2012 by the Ministry of Employment and the Economy with close co-operation with the Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry and the Ministry of the Environment. Other participants were the Prime Minister’s Office, the Ministry of Education and Culture, the Ministry of Social Affairs and Health, the Ministry of Finance, the administrative branches under these Ministries, as well as VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland. Stakeholders representing the bioeconomy gave their inputs to strategy preparation through workshops, interviews and on-line tools. The strategy was published in May 2014 with the objectives that the bioeconomy will reduce our dependence on fossil natural resources, prevent biodiversity loss and create new economic growth and jobs. Bioeconomy was defined as an economy that relies on renewable natural resources to produce food, energy, products and services.
The strategic goals of the Bioeconomy Strategy are:
1. A competitive operating environment for the bioeconomy,
2. New business from the bioeconomy,
3. A strong bioeconomy competence base,
4. Accessibility and sustainability of biomasses.
These goals were broken down into concrete tasks for the public sector. Ambitious numerical targets were defined for the implementation: Growth of the Finnish bioeconomy output from 60 billion euros up to EUR 100 billion by 2025 and to create 100,000 new jobs.
Future prospects
Finland has been in the implementation phase of the strategy for a year. Implementation of the strategy is led by the Strategic Programme for the Forest Sector of the Ministry of Employment and the Economy with close co-operation with Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry and the Ministry of the Environment. This tri-party arrangement, which was formed during the strategy process, has turned out to be advantageous in many ways, and it well represents the cross-sectorial nature of the Bioeconomy. The main industries involved are the forest industry, the chemical industry, the food industry, and the energy industry. The traditional industry boundaries are blurring and many companies now represent more than one of these sectors. We are increasingly talking also with the technology industries and the ICT-sector, as those sectors are key enablers and provide good growth prospects.
The Strategic Programme has an Advisory Board consisting of members from the industries, associations and academia, and there are plans to set up a national Bioeconomy panel with a broad representation. The emphasis on the first year of implementation were on improving the operating environment both in Finland and in the EU, boosting export of Finnish bioeconomy products and on raising public awareness. I will provide concrete examples of some of the actions in my presentation.
One of the main challenges is that the Bioeconomy is a very broad concept and there are lot of stakeholders and policy objectives with sometimes conflicting interests.
Finland has had recently a change of Government. The new government has ranked the Bioeconomy high on its agenda and it has revised some of the targets for the development of the Bioeconomy. Implementation plan with budget considerations are under planning.
Biosciences Principal Deputy, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA Abstract
Released in 2012, the National Bioeconomy Blueprint was developed for many reasons: to lay out strategic objectives to realize the full potential of the U.S. bioeconomy, to highlight early federal agency achievements toward those objectives, to signal to industry, investors and researchers a commitment to biological research as a driver of the future bioeconomy, and to provide guidance to federal science and technology funding agencies under challenging budgetary constraints. The objectives were developed based on national needs and societal challenges in health, energy, environment, and food as well as an understanding of relevant technological and economic trends. Briefly, the five objectives focus on strategic investments to provide the foundation for the future U.S. Bioeconomy; the translation of bioinventions from lab to market; regulatory reform to reduce barriers, increase speed and predictability of regulatory processes, and reduce costs while protecting human and environmental health; new training programs; and new public-private partnerships to drive the bioeconomy.
Secretary General, ICABR - International Consortium on Applied Bioeconomy Research; Assistant Professor, Department of Economics, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome Abstract
The term „bioeconomy“or „bio-based economy“ has emerged prominently in the second half of the nineties, as a result of the commercialization of the genetically modified crops in 1996. The Greek prefix „bio“ helped at enriching the social sciences „economics“ with all the disciplines involving the use of new molecular and cell biology discoveries (in particular those related to the DNA).
In a broad perspective the so-called Knowledge-based Bioeconomy or KBBE, the Bioeconomy is now regarded to be an economy as such using biological resources from the land and the sea, including waste ( biomass ) as inputs to food, feed, industrial and energy production . Its aims are twofold: produce sustainably new renewable raw materials in agriculture, forestry, fisheries and aquaculture, and/or process such feedstock into new value-added products in the Food, Feed and Industrial biobased and Energy industries. Agricultural was a key element of the traditional bioeconomy. The modern or new bioeconomy expands the science base of the traditional one to include modern knowledge of molecular and cell biology and take advantage of information technology and nanoscience. The global bioeconomy can be summarized into three main areas: agriculture biotechnology, biofuel, and green economy. While the first two themes rely directly or indirectly upon agriculture, recent advances in nanotechnologies deliver the promise to have significant effect in the agricultural industry.
Italy does not have any specific Bioeconomy policy. However, since the European Commission issued in 2012 its first European Strategy for Bioeconomy „Innovation for Growth - A Bioeconomy for Europe“ policies towards green growth models have received greater political prominence compared to the rest of the bioeconomy while the issues related to genetically modified organisms remains extremely controversial.
Together with UK and Czech Republic, Italy does not have an integrated strategy for the biobased economy, but is implementing bioeconomy-related policies and activities, and the elaboration of a corner stone by the end of 2015.
Green economy, in particular, is one of the key issue in Italian economic development, as the contribution of the sector to production and employment is large together with a very vibrant industrial system.
The major contribution of the government has been to promote funding research by taking part to EU programs (he Struc-tural Fund or Horizon 2020 ) in the area of biotechnology and biobased chemistry. This has allowed to help at modernizing the industrial and R&D sectors. However further efforts is required by the Italian firms to participate to international network in order to increase competitiveness. At the same time in 2013, a Sustainable Growth Fund was launched, with the aim to promote R&D projects in line with Horizon 2020.
Steps have been undertaken but the path is still long. The presentation will review the efforts of the Italian Government towards the elaboration of a bioeconomy strategy and green growth initiatives.
Head, Plant Sciences, Institute of Bio- and Geosciences, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH; Chairman, BioSC - Bioeconomy Science Center, Jülich Abstract
The bioeconomy concept is diverse, which often causes significant „academic“ discussions about definitions and scope of „The Bioeconomy“. The presentation will shortly address this debate, before applying a pragmatic approach towards a regionalisation of bioeconomy leading to value creation within the specific scope of a region or stakeholder communities and of drivers towards bioeconomy. This will lead to numerous implementations of bioeconomy pathways being part of a hybrid economy, in which bio-based solutions play a significant role, but where they are not loaded with dogmatic views. Even though pragmatic there are essential elements that have to be actively designed and implemented in order to make develop regional bioeconomy pathways. I will discuss the diversity and usefulness of this approach and potential pathways forward.
Professor of Forest and Environmental Policy, Department of Forest Sciences, University of Freiburg Chair
President, European Forum Alpbach, Vienna Comment
Professor, Institute of Forest Engineering, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna; General Manager, OeAD - Austrian Agency for International Mobility and Cooperation in Education, Science and Research; President, Austrian Association for Agricultural and Environmental Research, Vienna Chair
Economic Policy Advisor, Ecosocial Forum Europe, Vienna Coordination

DI Dr. Dr. h.c. mult. Martin H. GERZABEK

Rector, BOKU - University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences; President, BIOS Science Austria, Vienna

1980-1985 Studies, Agriculture, BOKU - University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna
1984 Scientific Staff Member, Austrian Research Centers (now: AIT - Austrian Institute of Technology), Vienna
1987 Promotion, Dr. rer.nat techn.
1993 Habilitation, Soil Science
1997-2003 Head, Department of Environmental Research, AIT - Austrian Institute of Technology, Vienna
since 2001 Full Professor, Environmental Toxicology and Isotopic Methods, BOKU - University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna
2003-2010 Vice-Rector for Research, BOKU - University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna
since 2009 Rector, BOKU - University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna

Dr. Jussi MANNINEN

Principal Scientist and Program Manager, Bioeconomy Transformation Program, VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland

1999-2006 Various research and managerial positions at VTT
2006-2009 Technology manager for Process Chemistry at VTT
2009-2001 Project manager for ERP-projects for the VTT Group
2011-2014 Programme Manager for a national Efficient Energy Use research programme
  Bioeconomy Strategy preparation
2013-2014 Programme Manager for Bioeconomy Transformation reseach programme at VTT and secretary for the Finnish
2014-2015 Development Manager for implementation of the Finnish Bioeconomy strategy , Ministry of Employment and the Economy

Ph.D. Mary E. MAXON

Biosciences Principal Deputy, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA

2001-2004 Associate Director & Anti-Infective Program Leader Cytkinetics, Inc.
2004-2006 Deputy Vice Chair California Institute for Regenerative Medinice
2007-2009 Marine Microbiology Initiative Lead, The Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation
2009-2012 Assistant Director for Biological Research, Executive Office of the President of the United States
since 2012 Biosciences Principal Deputy, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

Ph.D. Sara SAVASTANO

Secretary General, ICABR - International Consortium on Applied Bioeconomy Research; Assistant Professor, Department of Economics, University of Rome Tor Vergata, Rome

1992-1998 Programme Project Manager, International Centre for Economic and Financial Studies, Orbiter International S.r.l.
1997 B.A., Economics, Università degli Studi di Roma "Tor Vergata", Rome
2001-2005 Consultant, Development Economic Research Group, World Bank, Washington DC
2003 PhD, Economics, Università degli Studi di Roma "Tor Vergata", Rome
2005-2008 Economist, Evaluation Unit of Public Investment, Department for Development Policies, Italian Ministry of Development, Rome
 Assistant Professor, Economics, Department of Economics, Università degli Studi di Roma "Tor Vergata", Rome
 Secretary General, ICABR - International Consortium on Applied Bioeconomy Research
 Board Member, CEIS - Centre for Economics and International Studies, Università degli Studi di Roma "Tor Vergata", Rome
2005 Agriculture Economist, Commodity and Trade Division, FAO - Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, Rome

Dr. Ulrich SCHURR

Head, Plant Sciences, Institute of Bio- and Geosciences, Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH; Chairman, BioSC - Bioeconomy Science Center, Jülich

1982-1988 Studies Biology, University Bayreuth
1988-1991 Ph.D., University Bayreuth
1991-2001 Group Leader, Institute for Botany, University Heidelberg
2001 Habilitation, Botany, University Heidelberg
since 2001 Forschungszentrum Jülich
2001-2011 Director, ICG - Institute for Chemistry and Dynamics of the Geosphere, ICG-4: Phytosphere
since 2011 Director, IBG - Institute for Bio- and Geosciences, IBG-2: Plant Sciences
2004-2011 Member, Executive Board, EPSO - European Plant Science Organization
2006-2008 Research Director, Research Area Earth and Environment, Forschungszentrum Jülich
since 2006 Member, Executive Board, European Technology Platform Plants for the Future
2006 Founder, JPPC - Jülich Plant Phenotyping Center
2007-2012 Member, Steering Committee, European Technology Platform Biofuels
since 2007 Member, Directorate, KoGa - Competence Center for Horticulture
2008-2011 Vice President, EPSO - European Plant Science Organization
since 2009 Spokesman, IPPN - International Plant Phenotyping Network
since 2010 Chairman, BioSC - Bioeconomy Science Centers
since 2011 Coordinator, Cross-Program Activity Sustainable Bioeconomy, Helmholtz Association
since 2012 Coordinator, EPPN - European Plant Phenotyping Network
since 2012 German Head, LABEX Germany of EMBRAPA (Brazilian Agro Research Organization)
since 2012 Member, Science Advisory Board, German Association for the Support of Private German Plant Breeding
since 2012 Chief Executive Officer, QS Science Fund - Fruits, Vegetables and Potato
since 2012 Member, CEPLAS - Center of Excellence in Plant Sciences
since 2012 Coordinator, DPPN - German Plant Phenotyping Network
  Europe, Government of the Federal Republic of Germany
since 2013 Senior Official, EU-CELAC - workgroup Bioeconomy in the cooperation process between Latin America and
since 2013 Programme Speaker, Helmholtz Programme Key Technologies for the Bioeconomy
since 2014 Chairman of the European Technology Platform Plants for the Future

Dr. Daniela KLEINSCHMIT

Professor of Forest and Environmental Policy, Department of Forest Sciences, University of Freiburg

1993-1998 Studied Forestry Sciences and Social Sciences at the University of Göttingen
1998-2003 Doctoral Thesis in the area of Forest Policy (Contribution of the media to political success)
2003 Post-doc at the University of Hamburg on Agricultural Policy
2004-2008 Head of research group on international forest discourses at the University of Göttingen
2008 Researcher in agricultural policy at the University of Göttingen
2008-2010 Assistant Professor on Forest Policy at the Swedish University of Agriculture (SLU) in Uppsala
2010-2014 Associate Professor on Forest Policy at SLU

Dipl.-Ing. Dr. Franz FISCHLER

President, European Forum Alpbach, Vienna

1973-1979 Research Assistant, Institute for Agricultural Management, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna
1978 Doctorate, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna
1979-1984 Executive Assistant, Provincial Chamber of Agriculture of Tyrol, Innsbruck
1985-1989 Director, Provincial Chamber of Agriculture of Tyrol, Innsbruck
1989-1994 Austrian Federal Minister of Agriculture and Forestry, Vienna
1995-2004 European Commissioner for Agriculture, Rural Development and Fisheries, Brussels
2005-2011 Chairman, Ecosocial Forum and EU-Coordinator, Global Marshall Plan Initiative, Vienna
2005-2015 Chairman, RISE-Foundation, Brussels
2014-2015 Chairman of the Steering Committee of the EU scientific programme for Expo Milano 2015
since 2016 Chairman of the Scientific Committee of the Institute for Higher Studies, Vienna
since 2012 President, European Forum Alpbach, Vienna
since 2016 President of the Board of Trustees to the Austrian Institute of Advanced Studies (IHS), Vienna

Dr. Dr. h.c. Hubert DÜRRSTEIN

Professor, Institute of Forest Engineering, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna; General Manager, OeAD - Austrian Agency for International Mobility and Cooperation in Education, Science and Research; President, Austrian Association for Agricultural and Environmental Research, Vienna

1981-1989 Wissenschaftlicher Assistent am Lehrstuhl für forstliche Arbeitswissenschaft und Verfahrenstechnik an der Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München
1989-1999 Leitender Mitarbeiter und Mitinhaber (ab 1993) im Beratungsbüro DENDRON AG für Forstwesen und Raumplanung, Muntelier, Schweiz
seit 1999 Ordinarius für Forstliches Ingenieurwesen und Waldarbeit an der Universität für Bodenkultur Wien
1999-2001 Vorstand des Instituts für alpine Naturgefahren und forstliches Ingenieurwesen der Universität für Bodenkultur Wien
2000-2001 Vorsitzender des Fachsenats Wald- und Holzwissenschaften
2001-2003 Vizerektor für Ressourcen, Universität für Bodenkultur; Stellvertreter des Rektors nach UOG 1993
2003-2007 Rektor der Universität für Bodenkultur Wien
seit 2009 Geschäftsführer der OeAD-GmbH - Austrian Agency for International Cooperation in Education & Research

Technologiegespräche

Timetable einblenden

27.08.2015

10:00 - 12:30TechnologiebrunchSocial
13:00 - 13:10Eröffnung der Alpbacher Technologiegespräche 2015Plenary
13:10 - 14:00FTI-TalkPlenary
14:00 - 15:30Zukünftiges Leben mit der MaschinePlenary
16:00 - 17:30Cyber Physikalische SystemePlenary
19:45 - 21:15Regional Debate Central Eastern EuropePlenary
21:15 - 23:30AbendempfangSocial
21:15 - 23:30KarriereloungeSocial

28.08.2015

09:00 - 10:30BioökonomiePlenary
09:00 - 18:00Junior Alpbach - Wissenschaft und Technologie für junge MenschenBreakout
09:00 - 15:00Ö1 Kinderuni Alpbach - Wissenschaft und Technologie für KinderBreakout
10:50 - 12:15Complexity SciencePlenary
12:15 - 13:00Imbiss für die TeilnehmerInnen der Breakout SessionsSocial
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 01: 2015: Das Ende der EnergiewendeBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 02: Bio-Economy in Action: Nationale Bioökonomie-Strategien im VergleichBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 03: Human Enhancement Technologien: Verstärkung oder Reduktion von UngleichheitBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 04: Forschungsförderung zwischen Risiko, Kreativität und MainstreamBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 05: Marktumbrüche: Herausforderung und Chance für Innovation?Breakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 06: Entrepreneurship: Was kann das Wissenschaftssystem beitragen?Breakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 07: Spiele der UnGleichheitBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 08: Physisches Internet: Überragende Vision für Logistik und MobilitätBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 09: Dynamik durch Heterogenität: Wie Wirtschaft und Forschung von Unterschieden profitierenBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 10: Energiewende: Gleiches Ziel - ungleicher WegBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 11: Wasserstoff und Brennstoffzelle: Kommt der Marktdurchbruch?Breakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 12: Leuchtende Zukunft? Herausforderungen und Chancen der LED-BeleuchtungBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 13: Wahrheit und Wirklichkeit: Zur Bedeutung von Modellen in Ökonomie, Wissenschaft und PhilosophieBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 14: Virtuelles Lernen: Chancen(Un)Gleichheit im Bildungsbereich?Breakout
20:00 - 21:30Urban Innovators Challenge - Start Up Your CompanyPartner

29.08.2015

09:00 - 10:30Das Media Lab des MIT zu Gast bei den TechnologiegesprächenPlenary
10:30 - 11:30UnGleichheit: Die neue SeidenstraßePlenary
11:50 - 13:15Kunst, Design und Architektur als Labor der Digitalen ModernePlenary
13:15 - 13:30Abschluss-Statement der Alpbacher TechnologiegesprächePlenary
13:30 - 14:00Imbiss zum Abschluss der VeranstaltungSocial