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Cyber Physical Systems

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Erwin-Schrödinger-Saal
Plenary / Panel
english language

Not only do electronic devices, machines and power grids increasingly develop into intelligent systems; they also build very complex cyber-physical systems via IT networks, e.g. the internet cloud. What can these systems offer in the era of Industry 4.0, how are they built, who controls them and for what purposes should they better not be used?

Speakers

Professor and Head, Institute of Computer Engineering, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna Abstract
Your average car has more than forty processors, more than sixty sensors, and more than forty actuators, controlled by more than one hundred million lines of code. This is much more computation power than the one that was available to the space shuttle, which carried Neil Armstrong in 1969 to the Moon. Similarly, your smart phone has more than twelve sensors and a computation power that exceeds the one of Cray 1, the supercomputer developed Cray Research in 1975. By 2020, there will be more than one thousand embedded devices per person, to a total of 7 trillion for the entire world, according to a Freescale’s prediction.

Cyber-physical systems, with their application-domain-oriented incarnations, such as, the Internet of Things, the Cloud, the Fog, the Swarm, Industry 4.0, or the Industrial Internet, are expected to unleash this tremendous sensing, actuation, computation, and communication power, and pave the way towards a smarter planet. In this talk I will shortly review the history and characteristics of CPS, outline the current CPS achievements, discuss the main technological and scientific CPS challenges, and give a brief outlook on the impact that CPS will have on our educational system and more broadly, on our society.
Joseph Moore Professor and Chair, Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA Abstract
Over the past year, there is a lot of discussion regarding the Internet of things (IoT). IoT is the idea that physical things, sensors, actuators are coming online, and connecting them to our smartphones and cloud computing. IoT has been embraced by Silicon Valley as well as many companies. General Electric has launched the Industrial Internet, Intel has an IoT group, and Cisco calls it Fog Computing (cloud computing but closer to the ground). Then there is the Internet of everything (IoE) as well as the Trillion Sensor Challenge, where the goal is to have seven trillion sensor for seven billion people by 2017. A major European initiative is Industry 4.0. Even giant software companies, like Google, Facebook, and Amazon, are starting to invest heavily in hardware again. All this attention has caused Gartner to put IoT on the very top of their famous 2014 Hype Cycle chart.
How should academia react to this revolution? Does the tight integration of information with physical things present a great opportunity for exciting research research? What are the new challenges that industry needs our help with? In the United States, the National Science Foundation has embraced this broad agenda under the Cyber-physical Systems program. The Semiconductor Research Corporation has similarly invested in the so-called TerraSwarms Center. What are the differences between IoT and Cyberphysical systems? Is IoT an opportunity for inspiring students, innovation, and increasing enrollments in computer science and engineering? During the panel discussion I will raise and point to interesting areas for research and education.
Director, Innovative Factory Systems Department - German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence DFKI Abstract
Our industries are facing a period of major challenges. The customer demand for new products is coming at ever shorter intervals and is increasingly dependent on customized products that must be adapted for individual preferences. These challenges are evident in today's mobile phone market. Product life cycles of 6-9 months are the rule more frequently now and this is accompanied by a steady increase in the functionality of the products. Although enormous performance improvements in computer-aided technology (CAx) during the past 10 years have allowed the design and planning phases to be adapted to the different limiting conditions, a similar breakthrough is still awaited in the actual manufacturing technologies.
For solving this dilemma we can learn from the field of information and communication technologies. Computers are getting so small they seem to vanish inside nearly all of our technical devices. Beyond all this, things communicate in a world-wide network: the Internet. When we contemplate following this path into the future, we find that nearly all the things of everyday life will become smart nodes or cyber physical systems within a global network. This phenomenon is called the Internet-of-Things (IoT). This trend will certainly find its way also into industrial production. The strong bias of the electro-technical and hierarchical world of factory automation will transition to smart factory networks, which increasingly benefit from the advances in Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and computer sciences. This will lead us to smart production processes in smart factories.
Senior Vice President for Research and Dean, Hajim School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, University of Rochester; Director, Minerals Technologies Incorporated; Rochester Chair

Dipl.-Ing. Dr. rer. nat. Radu GROSU

Professor and Head, Institute of Computer Engineering, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna

1986 Dipl.-Ing., Computer Science, Technical University of Cluj-Napoca
1986-1990 System Engineer, Electronic Computing Centre, Cluj
1990-1995 Scientific Researcher, Department of Computer Science, Technische Universität München
1994 Dr. rer. nat, Computer Science, Technische Universität München
1995-1998 Scientific Assistant, Department of Computer Science, Technische Universität München
1998-2000 Research Associate, Department of Computer and Information Science, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia
2000-2007 Tenure-track Assistant Professor, Department of Computer Science, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook
2007-2012 Associate Professor with Tenure, Department of Computer Science, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook
since 2012 Full Professor, Faculty of Informatics, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna
since 2012 Research Professor, Department of Computer Science, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook

Ph.D. George J. PAPPAS

Joseph Moore Professor and Chair, Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA

1991 B.S., Computer & Systems Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY
1992 M.S., Computer & Systems Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY
1994 Graduate Fellow, Division of Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA
1998 Ph.D, Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California at Berkeley
2000-2004 Assistant Professor, Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia
2004-2007 Associate Professor, Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia
since 2007 Professor, Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia
since 2008 Joseph Moore Professor, Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia

Dr.-Ing. Detlef ZÜHLKE

Director, Innovative Factory Systems Department - German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence DFKI

1970-1976 Electrical Engineering RWTH Aachen
1976-1985 Researcher at WZL / RWTH Aachen
1983 PhD RWTH Aachen
1985-1991 Lufthansa AG / Vice President Aircraft Maintenance
since 1991 Professor for Production Automation / TU Kaiserslautern
 Since 2008 Research Director / DFKI GmbH
since 2005 Chairman of the Executive Board smartfactoryKL e.V.

Ph.D. M.Sc. B.Sc. Robert CLARK

Senior Vice President for Research and Dean, Hajim School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, University of Rochester; Director, Minerals Technologies Incorporated; Rochester

1992 Ph.D., Mechanical Engineering at Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University
1996-2001 Director, Center for Applied Control, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina
1998-2000 Associate Professor, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina
1999-2000 Chief Technology Officer, Imeron, Cary, North Carolina
2000-2001 Professor, Duke University
2001-2003 Jeffrey N. Vinik Professor, Duke University
2001-2007 Director, Center for Biologically Inspired Materials and Material Systems, Duke University
2001-2003 Senior Associate Dean for Research, Pratt School of Engineering, Duke University
since 2003 Secondary Appointment, Department of Biomedical Engineering
since 2003 Thomas Lord Professor of Engineering, Duke University
2003-2007 Senior Associate Dean, Pratt School of Engineering, Duke University
2007 Chair, Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, Duke University
2007-2008 Dean, Pratt School of Engineering, Duke University
since 2008 Professor, Hajim School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, University of Rochester
2008-2016 Dean, Hajim School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, University of Rochester
since 2010 Director, Minerals Technologies Incorporated (MTX)
2012-2016 Senior Vice President for Research, University of Rochester
since 2016 Provost and Senior Vice President for Research, University of Rochester

Technology Symposium

show timetable

27.08.2015

10:00 - 12:30Technology BrunchSocial
13:00 - 13:10Opening of the Alpbach Technology Symposium 2015Plenary
13:10 - 14:00RTI Policy TalkPlenary
14:00 - 15:30Living with the Machine in the FuturePlenary
16:00 - 17:30Cyber Physical SystemsPlenary
19:45 - 21:15Regional Debate Central Eastern EuropePlenary
21:15 - 23:30Career LoungeSocial
21:15 - 23:30Evening ReceptionSocial

28.08.2015

09:00 - 10:30BioeconomyPlenary
09:00 - 18:00Junior Alpbach - Science and Technology for Young PeopleBreakout
09:00 - 15:00Ö1 Children's University Alpbach - Science and Technology for KidsBreakout
10:50 - 12:15Complexity SciencePlenary
12:15 - 13:00Lunch Snacks for the Participants of the Breakout SessionSocial
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 01: 2015: The End of Energy RevolutionBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 02: Bio-Economy in Action: National Bio-Economy Strategies in ComparisonBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 03: Human Enhancement Technologies: Amplifying or Reducing InequalityBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 04: Research Promotion at the Interfaces of Risk, Creativity and MainstreamBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 05: Market Upheavals: Challenges and Opportunities for Innovation?Breakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 06: Entrepreneurship: What Can Science Contribute?Breakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 07: Games of InEqualityBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 08: Physical Internet: A Seismic Shift for Logistics and MobilityBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 09: Dynamics by Heterogeneity: How Economy and Research Profit from DiversityBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 10: Energy Transition: Same Goal - Different WaysBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 11: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells: A Market Breakthrough Ahead?Breakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 12: A Bright Future? Challenges and Opportunities for LED LightingBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 13: Truth and Reality: The Importance of Models in Economy, Science and PhilosophyBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 14: Virtual Learning: InEquality in Education?Breakout
20:00 - 21:30Urban Innovators Challenge - Start Up Your CompanyPartner

29.08.2015

09:00 - 10:30MIT and its Media Lab, Special Guest at this Year's Technology SymposiumPlenary
10:30 - 11:30InEquality: The New Silk RoadPlenary
11:50 - 13:15Art, Design and Architecture as a Laboratory of Digital ModernityPlenary
13:15 - 13:30Closing Statement of the Alpbach Technology SymposiumPlenary
13:30 - 14:00Snack ReceptionSocial