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11: Realities and Futures of Robotics

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Hauptschule
Breakout / Working Group
english language

At the moment, the field of robotics gets a high level of attention. However, the public’s perception is dominated by inflated expectations and fears, caused partly by the media. The diversity of these machines and their impact on economies and societies are highly complex and elusive due to their variety and the constantly growing cognitive abilities of robots. Experts from the various fields of robotics will therefore present their points of view and discuss the socio-economic upheavals that are to be expected.

Speakers

Professor of Individualized Building Production, Faculty of Architecture, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen Abstract
The programming of industrial robots is commonly monotonous, static and optimized for a clearly defined surrounding or task. Within the creative industry and construction, robotics needs to be able to adapt within dynamic and unstructured environments.
Our research at RWTH Aachen University and the Association for Robots in Architecture focusses on easy-to-use robotic interfaces with the goal of making robots accessible to novice users within the creative industry and building construction. Using force torque sensors as well as human-robot collaboration in the form of "haptic programming" we work on creative and intuitive robot programming to handle inhomogeneous materials such as wood and high material tolerances, detect and adapt to differences between digital design and physical reality and to achieve a satisfactory quality in assembly tasks for construction and robotic fabrication within the creative industry.
In the near future we see robotics as enablers and intuitive design interfaces for creative minds, similar to the use of smartphones or laptops, to bridge the gap between digital designs and individualized physical production.
Professor, Institute of Zoology, University of Graz Abstract
Since the beginning of human evolution, men have been using and imitating structures or strategies developed and used by other organisms. Simple examples of this behavior include copying the behavior of or sounds produced by prey to attract, then catch and kill them, or imitating the shape and surface features of fish and whales to achieve better mobility and greater speed in water.
It is, therefore, unsurprising that animal and human behavior is also being programmed into robots today. During the last decade, an increasing number of behavioral strategies inspired by nature have been developed, including swarming strategies to create robot swarms. Both complex algorithms to control the behavior of these robots, and interactions between animal swarms and robot swarms have been successfully developed.
Several groups of organisms, such as slime molds, ants and honeybees, display behavior applicable to robot swarms. Having done a great deal of research on honeybees, we are concentrating on these organisms. By studying their behavior and examining their strategies to successfully program swarm robots, in many cases answers to questions arise that lead us back to the natural source of the innovations: the organisms from which we have developed the algorithms.
Head of Unit Robotics and Artificial Intelligence, Directorate for Components and Systems, Directorate-General for Communications Networks, Content and Technology, European Commission, Luxembourg Abstract
Robotics is a fast-growing area, with robots having increasing presence in our lives. Robotics is essential for productivity and competitiveness, and it helps address societal challenges. Robotics and Artificial Intelligence are, with Big Data and the Internet of Things, the key drivers of a far-reaching digitisation of our economies. This digitisation leads to a transformation of products, production processes and business models. This poses a challenge but also holds major opportunities and potential for growth and the impact goes well beyond industry in our society. Digitisation and the introduction of increasingly sophisticated robots into new areas require an appropriate regulatory framework. The development will also have an impact on the skills required in the future and the organisation of work more generally. To address these issues, the European Commission has proposed measures in its Digitising European Industry initiative.
Professor and Head of Unit Geometry and CAD, Institute of Basic Sciences in Engineering Science, University of Innsbruck Abstract
For more than 50 years robots and manipulators are used in industry and research, so one would think that most or even all theoretical problems concerning the basic problems in kinematics, dynamics, control and sensing of these systems must be solved.
There is no doubt that this is true for the relatively simple industrial systems, but it is surprising that most of these problems for non-standard systems are not so well understood. Therefore, it is not surprising that robot systems are often well closed off in special environments to guarantee safety. On the other hand, future robot systems should be able to interact with human beings and collaborate with humans to enable new and creative working solutions. Future robot systems have to be more versatile for new application areas. To guarantee safety, for example for specialized surgical robots for minimal invasive surgery, it is necessary to understand completely the kinematic and dynamic behavior of the instrument, which is basic for a safe control.
The talk will highlight some of the challenges in theoretical robotics research and show that there is a need for this basic research to improve the capabilities and safety of existing systems and to design new and better-adapted systems for future applications.
Senior Principal Scientist, ABB Research Center Germany, Ladenburg Abstract
In recent years, the worldwide market for industrial robotics has been growing by around 10% p.a. With significant remaining potential to serve "dirty, dull or dangerous" workplaces, further growth at similar rates is plausible. New technologies adding to this promise are, for example, human-robot collaboration to combine human and robotic skills, or the digitalization of industrial production with new functionality from connectivity between machinery and components.
This gradual transformation of the industrial workplace puts pressure on the workforce. While robots will become easier to program for their more frequently changing tasks, industrial jobs will become more multi-faceted and demanding. While some jobs are eliminated by automation, new jobs are created. The challenge to society is that the qualification requirements for the latter are higher.
This impulse talk seeks to bring into focus questions facing society in connection with new technologies, taking the industrial workplace as an example. What choices do we have? Is technological development inevitable or is its objective to serve humanity? What is ethical and humanistic in this future?
Junior Group Leader, Institute of Neuroinformatics, University of Zurich and ETH Zurich Abstract
In order to be used in tasks, in which robots co-exist and co-operate with humans, robots have to rely on their own perception in order to recognise environmental situations at every moment in time and they have to be able to learn in order to react to changes in the environment or task parameters. Naturally, the fields of computer vision and machine learning work on the desired capabilities. However, the developed solutions often require computational resources and training data, which are incompatible with robotic learning scenarios. A possible alternative solution lies in understanding how biological neuronal systems of animals and humans solve the problem of behaviour generation and adaptation. Neuromorphic technology is building computing hardware and sensors, inspired by biological neuronal systems. This hardware harnesses some of the outstanding computational properties of biological neuronal systems: their low power consumption, event-based parallel processing, and co-location of processing and memory. Building cognitive systems in neuromorphic hardware fosters our understanding of neuronal basis of cognition in biological systems and may lead to a breakthrough towards more adaptive cognitive robots.
Professor for Autonomous Systems and Director, Institute of Robotics and Intelligent Systems, ETH - Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich Abstract
After the revolution of personal computer, the Internet and smartphones, robots might become one of the next digital revolutions. After the millions of industrial robot arms that have been installed over the past 40 years, robots are now gradually leaving the production halls and offering their services in challenging inspection and interventions tasks, in rescuing operations, mines, agriculture fields, power plants or as autonomous cars. These robots have to operate in dynamic and unpredictable situations, and have to perceive and understand their environments. The challenges are thus huge and manifold, from tactile interaction to intelligent perception and continuous learning and adaptation.
Robotics technology will enable to make our world a better place, help us to protect our environment, produce food with higher yield and much less pesticide or render mobility more efficient and sustainable. Europe, with its vast experience in high precision and high quality machines, has an excellent seed ground to conquer these fast expending markets and generate new high quality jobs.
Director, ROBOTICS - Institute for Robotics and Mechatronics, JOANNEUM RESEARCH Forschungsgesellschaft mbH, Klagenfurt Chair
Deputy Director, ROBOTICS - Institute for Robotics and Mechatronics, JOANNEUM RESEARCH Forschungsgesellschaft mbH, Klagenfurt Coordination

Dipl.-Ing. Dr. techn. Sigrid BRELL-COKCAN

Professor of Individualized Building Production, Faculty of Architecture, RWTH Aachen University, Aachen

since 2015 Director, Chair of Individualized Building Production, RWTH Aachen University
2014-2015 Professorship for Creative Robotics, Institute for Industrial Design, University of Art and Design, Linz
2005-2014 Lecturer,Rresearch/Project Assistant, Institute for Architectural Sciences,University of Technology, Vienna
2006 FWF-Research Pproject Assistant, Institute of Discrete Mathematics and Geometry, University of Technology, Faculty of Mathematics and Geometry, Vienna
2001-2015 Lecturer in Industrial Design and Architecture University of Applied Ars, Institute of Design, Vienna
since 2011 President and Co-Founder of the International Association for Robots in Architecture

Dr.Phil. Karl CRAILSHEIM

Professor, Institute of Zoology, University of Graz

1968-1976 Biologie, Karl-Franzens-Universität, Graz
1974-1977 Assistant, Institute for Zoology
1973-1976 Ph.D. thesis with Prof. K. Hagmüller, Intestinal Transport of Amino Acids in Rats
1976 Ph.D, Zoology and Biochemistry
1977-1988 Assistant Professor
1984-1996 Chairman, Commission for the Studies of Biologie and Earth Sciences
1984-2014 Lecturer at the department of Psychology Nutrition, Evolution, Anthropology.
1988 Habilitation, Zoology, Metabolic Physiology of the honeybee in dependence on the season
1988-1997 Associate Professor, Graz
1991 Sabbatical, University Illinois, USA, NIH-supported
1996-2001 Chairman, German section, IUSSI, Internationale Union zum Studium der sozialen Insekten
1995 Research, University of California, Riverside
1997 Appointment as University Professor, Full Professor, Karl Franzens Universität, Graz
1997 Head, Division for Metabolic Physiology
1998 Research, University of California, Riverside
1998-2003 Dean, Faculty of Science, Karl-Franzens-Universität, Graz
2001-2003 Vice Chairman, Senate of the Karl-Franzens-Universität, Graz
2003 Vice Chairman, Convent of the Karl-Franzens-Universität, Graz
2004-2007 Member of the Senate of the Karl-Franzens-Universität, Graz
2005 President, Standing Commission of Apimondia, Bee Biology
2006-2007 Chairman of the Scientists´ Council of the Karl-Franzens-Universität, Graz
2007 Dean, Faculty of Science, Karl-Franzens-Universität, Graz
2007-2011 President, Styrian URANIA, Adult Education Centre
2009-2013 President, Austrian Entomological Society
2011 Vice President, Styrian URANIA, Adult Education Centre

Ph.D. Juha HEIKKILÄ

Head of Unit Robotics and Artificial Intelligence, Directorate for Components and Systems, Directorate-General for Communications Networks, Content and Technology, European Commission, Luxembourg

1989 Researcher Associate - Research Unit for Computational Linguistics - University of Helsinki
1994 Postgraduate studies, University of Cambridge
1998 DG Translation - European Commission
2005 Project Officer - Cognition - DG Information Society - European Commission
2008 Deputy Head of Unit - Cognitive Systems, Interaction, Robotics - DG Information Society - European Commission
2014 Head of Unit - Robotics - DG Connect - European Commission

Dr. Dr. h.c. Manfred HUSTY

Professor and Head of Unit Geometry and CAD, Institute of Basic Sciences in Engineering Science, University of Innsbruck

1979 1984 contract assistent
1984 1989 university assistent
1989 Habilitation in geometry (Montan University Leoben)
1989-1997 assistant professor
1993&1994 Erwin Schrödinger Fellowship, research at Centre for Intelligent Machines, McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
1995 elected Associate Member of Centre for Intelligent Machines, McGill University
1997-2000 associate professor
since 2000 Professor, Geometry, University Innsbruck
2004-2008 Dean, Faculty of Civil Engineering
2013 Honorary Doctorate Technical University, Cluj-Napoca.

Dr. Björn MATTHIAS

Senior Principal Scientist, ABB Research Center Germany, Ladenburg

1979-1983 B.Sc., Physics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA
1983-1990 M.S., M.Phil., Ph.D., Physics, Yale University, New Haven, CT
1991-1994 Post-Doc., Physikalisches Institut, Universität Heidelberg, Germany
1994-2004 Senior Scientist, Program Manager, Group Leader, ABB Corporate Research
2004-2016 ABB Corporate Research, Senior Principal Scientist - Robotic Automation
since 2016 ABB Corporate Fellow - Robotic Automation

Ph.D. Yulia SANDAMIRSKAYA

Junior Group Leader, Institute of Neuroinformatics, University of Zurich and ETH Zurich

2000 - 2005 Diplom in Physics, Belorussian State University, Minsk, Belarus
2005 - 2006 M.Sc. (Physics), Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Germany
2006 - 2010 Dr. rer. nat. (Neural Computation, Physics), Institute of Neural Computation, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Germany
2013 & 2014 Visiting researcher, University Blaise Pascal, Clermont-Ferrand, France
since 2015 Postdoc, Junior group leader, Institute of Neuroinformatics, University of Zurich and ETH Zurich, Switzerland

Dr. Roland Yves SIEGWART

Professor for Autonomous Systems and Director, Institute of Robotics and Intelligent Systems, ETH - Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich

1984 Master, Mechanical Engineering, ETH Zurich - Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich
1984-1985 Research and Teaching Assistant, Turbomachinery Lab (Prof. Gyarmathy), ETH Zurich - Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich
1985-1986 Lecturer, Turbomachinery, Technical University (HTL), Zurich
1985-1989 Research and Teaching Assistant, Institute of Mechanics (Prof. Schweitzer), ETH Zurich - Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich
1989 PhD, Mechanical Engineering, ETH Zurich - Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich
1989-1990 Post-Doc, CDR - Center of Design and Research, Stanford University, California
1990-1996 Senior Scientist and Lecturer, Institute of Robotics, ETH Zurich - Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich
1990-1997 Vice-President Research & Development, MECOS Traxler AG
1996-2006 Associate / Full Professor in Microengineering, EPFL - École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne
2002-2006 Vice Dean, School of Engineering (STI), EPFL - École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne
2005 Visiting Professor, NASA Ames and Stanford University, California
since 2006 Full Professor for Autonomous Systems, ETH Zurich - Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich
2010-2014 Vice President Research and Corporate Relations, ETH Zurich - Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich
since 2015 Co-Director of Wyss Translational Center Zürich

DI Dr. Michael HOFBAUR

Director, ROBOTICS - Institute for Robotics and Mechatronics, JOANNEUM RESEARCH Forschungsgesellschaft mbH, Klagenfurt

since 2014 Scientific- and Managing Director, ROBOTICS
2011-2014 Chartered Engineer, ZT Hofbaur, Graz
2009-2014 Professor, Chair of the Institute of Automation and Control Engineering, University UMIT in Hall i. Tyrol, Austria
2004-2009 Vice Deputy Head, Associate Professor University of Technology, Graz, Austria
2000-2001 University Assistant, University of Technology, Graz
1993-2004 Research Trainee, Tampere University of Technology, Finland Austria

DI Mathias BRANDSTÖTTER

Deputy Director, ROBOTICS - Institute for Robotics and Mechatronics, JOANNEUM RESEARCH Forschungsgesellschaft mbH, Klagenfurt

since 2015 JOANNEUM RESEARCH - Institute for Robotics and Mechatronics
2009-2015 UMIT - Institute for Automation and Control Engineering, University Assistant
2008-2009 BMW Steyr, Development Engineer

Technology Symposium

show timetable

25.08.2016

13:00 - 13:10OpeningPlenary
13:10 - 14:15RTI TalkPlenary
14:30 - 14:50From Austria to Silicon Valley - Cyber Security as a Global FactorPlenary
14:50 - 16:10Cybernetics in Advanced Energy and Production SystemsPlenary
16:30 - 17:45Complexity and the New EnlightenmentPlenary
20:00 - 20:15Best of Art and ScienceCulture
20:15 - 21:15Tickets to Berlin: Falling Walls Lab Austria and Alpbach Summer School on EntrepreneurshipPlenary
21:30 - 23:00Career LoungeSocial
21:30 - 23:30Evening ReceptionSocial

26.08.2016

09:00 - 10:30Digital MedicinePlenary
09:00 - 18:00Junior Alpbach - Science and Technology for Young PeopleBreakout
09:00 - 15:00Ö1 Children's University Alpbach - Science and Technology for KidsBreakout
10:30 - 12:30Cross-sektorale Kooperationen von ClusternPartner
11:00 - 12:30Personalized Cancer MedicinePlenary
12:30 - 13:00Lunch Snacks for the Participants of the Breakout SessionsSocial
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 01: Innovation by Making: Paradigm Shifts and New Innovation CulturesBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 02: Silicon Austria: A Game Changer for Austria as a High-Tech Location?Breakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 03: Creating the Future: How to Reinvent Innovation ProcessesBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 04: The Cycle of Innovation and its EcologyBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 05: Heavy Impact of Lightweight DesignBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 06: Looking Into the Unknown and Shifting HorizonsBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 07: Radical Innovations: More Courage to Take RisksBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 08: The Acceptance of Technologies by Pupils with Migration History - a Plea for Transcultural Competence as new EnlightenmentBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 09: Cyber Security: A Fundamental RightBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 10: Open Access & Open Innovation - Tools for a New Enlightenment?Breakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 11: Realities and Futures of RoboticsBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 12: Energiewende - Empowering ConsumersBreakout
13:00 - 18:00Breakout Session 13: Security of Supply as a Locational FactorBreakout
19:00 - 20:30Innovation Marathon: Ideas Made to Order - 24 Hours NonstopPlenary

27.08.2016

09:00 - 10:30Art Meets Science and Technology - Towards a New EnlightenmentPlenary
10:45 - 11:45Open Innovation: New Enlightenment? Participation - Democratisation - New SolutionsPlenary
12:15 - 13:30ETH Zurich, this Year's Special Guest at the Technology SymposiumPlenary
13:30 - 14:00Snack ReceptionSocial